Month: April 2018

Managing endometriosis pain

Did you know that a significant amount of endometriosis pain is driven by inflammation? And this inflammation is typically at its worst in the week you have your period. If you have endo, you won’t be surprised by this at all, right?   What do […]

What are the best foods to support good thyroid health?

To round out the thyroid health series, let’s look at how we can eat to support our thyroids!   Making sure you have enough zinc, iodine and selenium in your diet are key ways of supporting your thyroid health.   Including lots of fruit and […]

Let’s talk about endometriosis!

What is endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis is one of the most common chronic hormonal disorders affecting women in reproductive age, affecting up to 10% of women.

 

Endometriosis has been described as an autoimmune condition where endometrial tissue typically grows on the outside of the uterus instead of on the inside. The tissue is most commonly found around the organs in the pelvis, but can grow anywhere on the body, turning into growths and lesions in the intestines, bladder, rectum, even as far up as the nose!

 

Endometrial tissue typically responds to the changes in our hormones across each phase of our cycle, as it would if it was in our uterus. Endometriosis sufferers usually have excess estrogen in relation to progesterone, which drives the ongoing hormonal imbalance.

 

The primary symptoms are pelvic pain and infertility, as well as painful periods, painful sex and painful urination.

 

There are four stages of severity to endometriosis; ranging from stage one: minimal endometriosis to stage four: severe endometriosis. The level of severity depends on the number, size and location of adhesions and endometrial tissue.

 

Diagnosis is usually done through a surgical laparoscopy.

 

Getting a diagnosis

 

Did you know that it can take up to 7.5 years and sometimes even 10 years to get a full endometriosis diagnosis?

 

It’s so important for women to feel confident about advocating for themselves in medical situations and empowered to ask the right questions so that we get the answers and diagnosis we deserve.

 

Pain is not normal and is a sign that something is wrong. If you’re experiencing pain, never let someone tell you that it’s all in your head! You know your body best!

 

Endometriosis pain can be severe and it can be systemic, with inflamed endometrial tissue appearing outside of the uterus.

 

If a doctor tries to minimise your pain, then get a second, third or fourth opinion. Do what it takes to get a medical professional that will listen to you, take what you say seriously and help you find the answers you need and deserve.

 

Do your research. Knowledge is power and will help you advocate for better health outcomes.

 

Keep track of how you feel and your pain levels, so you’re armed with evidence that will help you fight your corner.

 

Most of all, be relentless in your pursuit of good health.

 

Do you want help improving endometriosis pain? My short e-book, ‘Six Ways To Fix Your Period Pain‘ will give you practical tips to change your period for the better.

 

Photo by Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

Let’s talk about how our thyroids are affected by stress!

  Let’s talk about your thyroid and stress!   Good thyroid health is closely connected the health of your glands that produce your stress hormones – your adrenals. These tiny glands are located on top of your kidneys.   Chronic stress is the enemy of […]

Do you need to care more about your thyroid in your 40s and 50s?

Do you need to think about your thyroid health more as you move into your 40s and 50s?   In short, yes!   Research shows that hypothyroidism tends to be more common in women over 40, as thyroid hormone production gradually decreases as we get […]

Why you need to care about your thyroid!

 

Over the last week, we’ve been talking about our thyroids. We’ve talked about what happens when you produce too much thyroid hormone and when you produce too little.

 

We’ve learned that the thyroid is a bit like Goldilocks – you want to make sure that you get the balance just right.

 

You might be thinking, “well, Le’Nise, neither of those apply to me, so why do I need to care about my thyroid?”.

 

Your thyroid controls your body’s metabolism and energy (that’s pretty important, right?), however nothing in our body works in isolation. Research shows that imbalances in our progesterone & estrogen levels can have an effect on our thyroid hormone production and vice versa.

 

Taking care of your hormone health (with sleep, a balanced diet, stress reduction, regular emptying of the bowels and lots of physical movement) isn’t just about caring for reproductive hormones – your thyroid and stress hormones will also benefit too!

 

Would you to find out more about your thyroid or ask specific questions related to your thyroid or hormone health? Book in for a free 30 minute Hormone Health Review!

 

Photo by Denys Nevozhai on Unsplash

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What happens when you produce too much thyroid hormone?

In my last post, I talked about producing too little thyroid hormone. Now let’s talk about what happens when you produce too much.   Do you often feel out of breath or short of breath?   You might have trouble keeping weight on.   Do […]

I Tried It: Giving Up Sugar For Lent

  It’s spring and it’s time for change and renewal.   For me, this is the time of year when I take stock and look at what’s working and what isn’t.   Sugar wasn’t working for me. My moods were up and down, my skin […]

What happens when you produce too little thyroid hormone?

If your thyroid hormones are a little bit like Goldilocks, what happens when you produce too little of them?

 

You may find that you struggle to lose weight.

 

You might feel tired all the time.

 

You might empty your bowels less than once a day.

 

You might always have cold hands & feet and fight with your partner over the thermostat in the winter.

 

You might feel a little down in the dumps but aren’t sure why.

 

You might have a hard time concentrating or feel a little foggy.

 

These aren’t normal things you should expect as part of ageing.

 

When you piece the puzzle together, these symptoms can be the sign of an under active thyroid.

 

If you feel like this, I would encourage you to see your doctor and get your thyroid hormones (TSH / T4 / T3) checked as part of a full blood test.

 

Do you have any questions? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone health review!

 

Photo by Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

How much do you know about your thyroid?

  Let’s talk about our thyroids!   Our thyroids are a gland that sit in our neck and produce thyroid hormones, which are one of the top three most important hormones for women.   Can you guess the other two? Estrogen and cortisol!   Over […]