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Period Story Podcast, Episode 81, Jess Bolton: Find Someone You Trust To Talk About Your Feelings

My guest on today’s episode of Period Story is Jess Bolton, the opposable thumbs behind Worried Whippet, a social media platform that is a celebration of everyday bravery through the eyes of a small dog.

In this episode, Jess shares: 

  • The symptoms and experience that led to her seeking out an ADHD diagnosis 
  • What the ADHD tax is and how it has affected her 
  • How she’s been able to use her diagnosis to positively benefit her business and the way she works 
  • Why she made an Instagram account for her dog and the amazing opportunities that have come from this 
  • How talking about her dog’s anxiety has led others to have conversations about their own mental health
  • Why she focused on bravery in her first book Worried Whippet: Inspiration to be Brave
  • Her new podcast Brave Little Podcast 
  • And of course, the story of her first period

Jess says whatever’s weighing on you, whatever feelings you’re contending with, they’re probably a completely appropriate response to whatever’s happening around you. And the best thing you can do is find somebody you trust or somebody with authority and talk to them about it.

Thank you, Jess! 

Get in touch with Jess:

Book – Worried Whippet: Inspiration To Be Brave

Human Jess – Instagram 

Worried Whippet – Instagram

Brave Little Podcast 


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SHOW TRANSCRIPT

Le’Nise Brothers:

Hi, Jess. I’m so excited to have you on the show today. I’m so interested in the work that you’re doing, which we’ll get into. But let’s start off by telling, you telling us the story of your very first period.

Jess Bolton:

Well, I was trying to work this out yesterday in preparation for this podcast, but I remember it being on my birthday, which was so exciting, and in my first year of secondary school. And I thought at the time, I think that’s probably, I think maybe you’re 11 in your second year of secondary school. That must’ve been my 12th birthday, and that felt really early. But now I know that probably loads of people had started their period already and we just weren’t talking about it. But I definitely felt like I had this badge of honor.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And so what was the experience like and did you know what was happening when you got it?

Jess Bolton:

No, so I think, well I, I must have had my period for a couple of days before I realized that that was what it was. I think I was expecting a Halloween costume, blood capsule, red liquid to come gushing out of me or something. And what actually happened is very different to that and was more like a change in my discharge. So I think it took me a couple of days to cotton on, and then when I did, I was like, whoa. Yeah, not at all what I was expecting.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And did you go and speak to a parent or a friend or a sibling about it?

Jess Bolton:

I spoke to a friend of mine who’d started her period in the same week, so she was three days ahead of me, which at the time it felt like she had an awful lot more information than me. I’m sure she did. But it was definitely the kind of thing where I talked to my peers first. I never spoke to a teacher or anything. I was in all girls school, so information flowed freely in the corridors. And there was definitely an exchange of period products going on and stuff. So I had no trouble finding a pad and sorting myself out. And then the first grownup I told was my mum when I got home and she was great.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And when you say she was great, what was the experience telling her?

Jess Bolton:

I think I was nervous and I think she was probably a bit, I think as a parent you’ve been waiting for that moment, haven’t you? So I got a little sense of that. And yeah, we chatted through my options in terms of period products and we went shopping together and kitted me out.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And then after your first period, what was your experience of your period throughout your tweens and then into your teens?

Jess Bolton:

Well, it’s funny because nowadays I’m somebody who talks quite publicly and openly about these things, but I was not, at the time, I found it quite embarrassing. I guess the whole concept of having a period I found quite embarrassing. I found having boobs really embarrassing. I think having a body, I just found a really difficult thing as a teenager. So yeah, my overriding memories are trying to hide it from boys. I was dating, putting tampons and pads up my sleeve to go to the bathroom. What else? Oh, when you show and you are devastated and your whole world comes crashing down around your ears and you’re like, this is the most humiliating thing ever to happen to me. Yeah, those are the kinds of memories that I have of my period as a teenager.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Can you say a little bit more about this embarrassment, because I find it such an interesting concept because I’m talking a lot about embarrassment with my son at the moment. He’s 10. And talking about this idea, embarrassment is when you care about what other people think about you and you care about their opinions. And this idea, stop caring so much about what other people think. Say a little bit more about this embarrassment and what it felt and why it affected you in terms of the way that you felt about your body and your period.

Jess Bolton:

I think I definitely cared very deeply about what other people thought of me, and it was heavily informed by the kinds of media that I was consuming. I think I had this very unrealistic idea of what my body was supposed to look like and what it was supposed to perform, and I was very unforgiving. So anything that my body did that was outside of that very unrealistic box was a humiliation, I think, which is so sad to look back on, especially because when I think about it, I think I thought I was upset by things like stubble and shaving rash, which is a natural, the only appropriate response that your body has to shaving. Everybody has it. But in my head, I was the only one and it was mortifying and my body was misbehaving and doing things that shouldn’t do. Same with things like my curly hair and my ringlets felt really less like taboo, but again, I was like, come on body, just conform. Do the right stuff. And I think lots of it was very gendered as well. I was very conscious of how I was perceived by boys and I felt like I was doing a lot of things for boys, and I think my period just felt like the ultimate thing that could show me up and embarrass me and make me feel dirty and unworthy.

Le’Nise Brothers:

It’s so interesting. As you were talking, I was thinking about how this is so common, this embarrassment and this concern about what other people think. And then as you get older you realize actually people are just, they’re having the same thoughts and they’re so worried about themselves that most of the time they’re not even thinking about you. They’re just worried about, well, what’s she thinking about me? But it seems to be this very common experience, this kind of teenage embarrassment, this coming into your body, things being feeling really unwieldy. And what about now? What’s your experience of your period now? What’s your relationship with your period now?

Jess Bolton:

So now I have the Mirena coil, which has totally changed how my periods manifest. So I’ve had it for about eight years and I basically almost don’t have periods. I don’t really bleed. I bleed a bit, but I don’t use period products, I haven’t done in ages. I think I used a tampon for the first time in years the other day and I was like, this is a strange experience. So I like that side of things. It’s working quite well for me. My contraception and stuff, which is great, hasn’t always been the case and isn’t the case for everybody. But I do have, I know that something is up with my periods. I have always had painful periods, which I always thought was normal. I’m now learning thanks to people like you that it’s not and doesn’t have to be. And I’ve definitely had this sense since my early twenties that there’s something slightly squiffy maybe with my hormones and stuff. So sometimes I actively engage with that and think about it. Most of the time I just put it out of my head and don’t really think about my periods much.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Okay. And talk a little bit about this sense about that something’s going on and with the pain. Can you talk about, describe the pain a little bit? I think this is really interesting, will be interesting for a lot of listeners and certainly on my TikTok account, one of the number one questions I get is, I have a really painful period. Is it normal? I throw up from the pain on my period? Is this normal? I can’t get out of bed first two days of my period? I thought this was normal. And I think the more we talk about what pain feels like and we de-normalise it, the more we’ll be able to shift away from stop away from this idea that period pain is just something that we’re supposed to experience.

Jess Bolton:

Experience. Yeah. Well, I mean, I guess the reason that I didn’t think of it as an issue until I was in my twenties is because when I was at school, lots and lots of people had painful periods. I knew one person who’d been diagnosed with PCOS and it was a major deal, but for the rest of us, we were just having what we assumed were normal periods and some of them were painful and I knew that, I mean, there was one girl in my class who had such painful periods that she would faint regularly, would vomit, and that was kind of normal. Occasionally she’d go to the doctors on site or whatever, but most of the time we just knew that that was happening and it was something we all put up with and we’d be like, oh, can we get you a glass of water or anything while she was lying on the floor. But for some reason, culturally that was something that we accepted as normal. I think we’d probably been told that it was normal. And so we internalised that. So my periods having been painful, but much less painful than that. No fainting, no vomiting, not even a full day in bed. I thought, well, aren’t I getting off lightly? At least I’m not literally passed out on the floor.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah. I want to shift gears a little bit and talk about ADHD because this is something you talk a lot about on your Instagram account, your @human.jess Instagram account, because Jess is also the name of one of your dogs.

Jess Bolton:

Unfortunately, yes. Not by design. I feel like I have to point that out. She was adopted.

Le’Nise Brothers:

But it’s been really interesting to see your journey over the last couple of years and see how you’ve been going on this pathway. You’re discovering, of the discovery of what’s been going on and how you’ve the diagnosis and how you’ve been managing this. So can you just say a little bit more about your journey and talk a little bit about the signs and the symptoms that you notice in yourself that prompted you to pursue a diagnosis?

Jess Bolton:

So when I think about the signs and the symptoms, now that I understand what ADHD is and how it manifests and how it manifests in women specifically, I’ve got almost every symptom and it seems obvious and makes a lot of sense, but I didn’t recognize it until I was diagnosed a year ago. And the reason I started thinking about it was because I had this pattern at work, which was where I would get a job, start out really well, perform really well, enjoy myself, people would like me, it was all going really well. And then three to six months in, I would start feeling overwhelmed and panicked and desperate to get out. And I think I felt like things were getting on top of me. I was struggling with other people’s systems and it felt very oppressive and I felt like I just couldn’t cope and couldn’t perform in those environments.

So I would spend the next nine months or a year or two years feeling constantly panicked and miserable and eventually I would leave and get a new job and the cycle would start again. So I was doing that for a decade and last year I was in a job that was very high pressured where the role had changed a lot and I was really struggling. So I was crying in the mornings before work, I was crying every day on my lunch break, my husband and I would go for a walk with the dogs and I’d cry for an hour and then I’d cry when I closed my laptop at the end of the day. I was like, this is not normal. So I rang my GP and got signed off work. I couldn’t cope at all. And while I was signed off, I did some research and I was like, I’m going to have to go back in two weeks time to work and try and perform in this role.

And while I was doing this research, I was looking up, can’t hold down a job and all of this stuff, and I started reading about ADHD and it really struck a chord and resonated and I realized it was manifesting in loads of other areas of my life. And yeah, they were all parts of my life where I just kind of felt like a failure. I felt like the kind of person who just, I couldn’t look after my stuff. I just thought I’m not capable of looking after my stuff and that’s a personality defect that I’ll just live with. Or I thought, I’m not organised, I never will be, I can’t be. And I used to get in a lot of trouble for it at school. And again, that’s just a personality defect of mine. So I was doing terrible things for my self-esteem, terrible things for my working life. And I just hit a kind of rock bottom and ended up with a diagnosis of ADHD.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And how long did it take you to get formally diagnosed?

Jess Bolton:

It was really quick because I did it privately and paid because I was in such a difficult spot and it felt so urgent and I thought if I can have this diagnosis and I can go back to work and I can say this is what’s happening to me, then maybe my situation will change.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And what changed after you got your diagnosis?

Jess Bolton:

Well, I got bought out of my contract at work. So when I went back after my time off, they said, this doesn’t look like it’s working for you. We don’t think it’s working for us. How would you feel about being bought out of my contract? And I’d known for a really long time that I wanted to go freelance. I’ve got this social media business that I was running like a business, and that had always been my dream and my aspiration. So suddenly I had a little bit of money, like a few months salary, and I had this opportunity and I just thought, I’m going to grab this with both hands. And I did. And this is the first job I’ve had where I’m a whole year in and it’s going better than it was at the beginning.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Amazing. Something I remember you posting about, I think this was before you got your formal diagnosis, was spending and attitudes around money and losing money and misplacing and not knowing what you did with things that you bought and having to buy things over again. And that’s something that I’ve seen a lot with. I seem to know a lot of women with ADHD, which is really interesting and that’s something that, a theme that I’ve seen quite a lot. Can you talk a little bit about that?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, so they call it the ADHD tax and it’s a very real thing, and there’s a charity that’s totted up what they think it costs in a year, and it’s like hundreds if not thousands of pounds. So for me it was things like I lost my passports all the time. At one point they would only issue me a one year passport because I’d lost so many that they had to put a control on it. And every time you’re paying hundreds of pounds to get an emergency passport thing, you obviously don’t realize until you need it and then you’re in a rush and you’re traveling across the country. That kind of thing would happen to me all the time, but also losing money in your house. I remember one really formative experience when I was a teenager where I left 60 pounds in a school locker over the holidays and it was a big deal for me. It was all the money I had and for my parents, and I just remember it being this huge thing and that was quite formative, but that’s something that would happen to me all the time. Whenever I look at my finances, I’m paying for the same thing three times the same prescription, subscription and then stuff that I haven’t canceled.

And just the cost of doing so many things last minute in a panic is a big one.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And now that you have your diagnosis, what has changed for you? Have you gone down a pathway where it’s this greater awareness that you have so you’re able to manage your behaviors better? Have you had a prescription and gone a more medicated route? Can you just talk a little bit about that?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, so I tried medication for a week and decided it wasn’t for me, which is actually not long enough to give it at all, but I was in that really difficult point in life and I was like, it was the wrong time. So I stopped doing that. And then since I’ve been working for myself, the symptoms that I was so worried about before, some of them are assets now, some of them I can just cope with and breathe through, and that’s okay. I think the biggest thing that’s changed for me is that I’m kinder and more compassionate with myself. I understand myself better, and I’m not thinking of myself as a person who just can’t do things, who just isn’t responsible and doesn’t care and all of those things. I understand now that I am working within a slightly different framework in my brain and that there’s just so much going on up there that sometimes I lose track of things and that’s okay.

So I feel better able to explain that to people. I feel better able to manage the emotional side of it in myself, but also I did spend some time looking into processes and systems that might help me, and I’ve actually found those really helpful and it’s been a big change. It’s things like I set timers on my phone when I’ve got tasks to do and it puts me under a little bit of pressure and it means that I get things done to completion, which is not something that I’ve been very good at historically. Or I use this thing called the Pomodoro method. I don’t know if you’ve heard of it.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, I have. But can you just say a bit for those who are listening who haven’t?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, absolutely. So again, it’s based around timers and timing your tasks, but the way that it works is that you work in 25 minute sprints basically, where you focus on one task and one task only, which was completely alien to me at the beginning, but it’s a good idea. It works. And then you take a five minute break and then you do it again, and then you have a longer break. But it just means that instead of asking your brain to focus indiscriminately for an unknown amount of time, you’re saying, I need you to focus on this one task, but only for these 25 minutes, and then you get a break.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And that’s been helpful for you?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, yeah. I don’t use it every day, but on the days where I’m struggling to get a specific task and then yeah, I find it really helpful.

Le’Nise Brothers:

That idea of compassion, self-compassion is really interesting. And what I found really interesting is that once you had the diagnosis, but also that you moved away from a kind of very formal work setting, you found a real difference in your attitude towards your work and what you actually were able to do. And I do wonder about the pressures that we put under ourselves under in formal work environments where you are working to someone else’s schedule and what that does. I mean, that’s kind of the way of the world and that’s the way that the corporate world is set up, unfortunately. But I do think that, I know companies are starting to think more about people who think differently and behave differently and how they can structure work differently. But in the majority of jobs, it just doesn’t feel like you can sometimes feel like a square peg in a round hole.

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, definitely. And I think the thing that I’m doing at the moment work-wise is very unstructured and chaotic, but it’s working, which is that most days I just wake up in the morning and I just lean into the thing that most takes my fancy. And when I’m working on things that I’m interested in and engaged with, I get them done and I get ’em done well, and I get them done quickly. If I’m trying to do things that I just can’t get my brain to connect with, then it takes me days, it grinds me down, it affects my self-esteem, it slows me down across the board. But I’ve been able to identify those things and let go of them or outsource them or just get more support with them. And instead, I don’t, don’t work to a timetable. I don’t say, I’m going to do this on Thursday afternoon at three. I just wake up in the morning and I do the thing that is calling me, and somehow it seems to be working.

Le’Nise Brothers:

That’s amazing to be able to readjust, change your life so you can work in that way. I love that and I love that you’ve been able to do that. And this kind of leads us on nicely to talk more about the work itself. So it all kicked off with the Worried Whippet, was it on TikTok or was it Instagram?

Jess Bolton:

It was Instagram and it was in 2020 before the first lockdown. And I’d wanted to make an account for my dog for ages, but I was really embarrassed about it. I was like, what will people think? It’s so lame, don’t do it. But I was loving all these other people’s dog accounts, and then I thought, why are you limiting yourself and putting yourself down and whose voice is that in your head? Anyway? So I went for it and I was posting about Jess, my Whippet, who is, we are her third home. She’s had a lot of trauma and a difficult past and she’s been with us for five years now, and we’ve spent every one of those five years working through a lot of anxiety with her that she’ll carry forever. And that’s very relatable for me and turns out loads of other people. So these posts about my dog became about my dog’s anxiety, and they started resonating with people. And then we obviously went into this lockdown where everybody was struggling with the same thing. She was struggling with leaving the house and meeting new people and all of those things. And it just seemed to sort of take off.

Le’Nise Brothers:

It’s so funny because you think, okay, anxiety in humans and depression in humans, but then when you hear about a dog being anxious or a dog being depressed, it’s like almost people make a joke about it, but it’s very real. Can you just talk a little bit about that, how you noticed that your dog was anxious?

Jess Bolton:

Well, she was sort of screaming at us, it’s quite a severe, or it was, it’s less so now it’s better managed, but there’ve been some quite severe symptoms for her. And that’s actually sometimes the stuff that I don’t tend to share. The stuff that I do share is she’s a bit nervous about leaving the house and stuff. In her sort of most fearful moments, I’m in the trenches with her working for it. But yeah, I think it’s the decision making that resonates with people. She tries to push herself to do things that are a bit outside her comfort zone and will she, won’t she? And you can see on her face that she’s having exactly the same thought process that you would be having. And I think you’re right that people are dismissive of it sometimes, and I totally get that. Also, I feel like sometimes what it’s done in my space, the space that I occupy, is I’ve noticed that it lowers the barriers for people to having these conversations about themselves and their own mental health. I think sometimes when you look at a dog who’s struggling with something that you are struggling with, you look at the dog and you think, oh, and your impulse is to kind of nurture them and give them space to feel their feelings. And that’s not always the first impulse we have with ourselves. But I think somehow it triggers that in people.

And I also find that most of my followers are women, but men are overrepresented in my inbox of my direct messages and they share very openly. And I think again, there’s something about the idea that it’s a dog behind the account, a sweet little dog who’s struggling with something similar to you that somehow creates the space for people to open up. And that’s been quite extraordinary to see, and it really took me by surprise at the beginning. But yeah, somehow that’s what she’s created.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And so how do you treat it? How you deal with is the wrong way to put it, but how do you manage these situations where people are emailing you or DMing you really personal stories? Is it about holding space for them or is it about pointing them to resources? How do you manage it?

Jess Bolton:

Usually about holding space, but definitely pointing to resources in a few cases where it looks like people are really struggling. And I do have some kind of international resources shared on my phone because when everybody’s spread out across the world, you can’t direct somebody to a crisis line and their hometown or something, it’s quite difficult. But yeah, I’ve always worked in mental health and sexual health and on social media in my career, so I understood a framework for if somebody’s in crisis, this is what you do, which I haven’t used very often, but usually it’s just people sharing stories about day-to-day issues in their lives. 

So I do this thing called the worry box, which is where I share a question box to my stories and I say, leave your worries here for the day. Go about your day. We’ll look after them and you can come back and pick them up later. And people put extraordinary stuff in those boxes, and most of it is really mundane. The majority is usually about at times like this where there’s a lot going on in the world like that dominates. But usually there’s an awful lot about jobs and work. People are really struggling in those areas at the moment and obviously personal relationships and illnesses and mental health. And it’s really interesting to see. Well, it’s amazing that people feel able to do that and open up and offload. And it’s also amazing to see, to get such an insight into as a population, what we’re struggling with and to see how it changes over time. And yeah.

Le’Nise Brothers:

It is really extraordinary how people are so willing to open up to strangers. And I definitely see this in my social media where people will share the most detailed, intimate things with me. And then I say, have you spoken to your partner, your doctor, your parents about this? No, I’m afraid. And sometimes it’s just the fact that people don’t know you or there’s some sort of connection, like maybe it’s a parasocial relationship where they’d feel it’s actually okay to open up. And I think it’s important to have these spaces when there is so much going on in the world and people are struggling and they don’t necessarily know where to turn, especially with men, where there’s this kind of attitude certainly in the UK where stiff upper lip and all that or be man up and kind of nonsense and you’re having spaces where men can say, well, actually this is how I feel is really important.

Jess Bolton:

Completely. I think the way that men engage with the account has been the thing that’s taken me most by surprise and I’m honored to be holding that space for them. But it’s such a shame that for lots of them, it’s the first time they’ve talked about something. And I don’t know, maybe it’s the last. It’s such a shame that there aren’t other avenues that feel open to them.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And so this year, this past September, you released your first book, Worried Whippet: Inspiration to be Brave. Can you talk about why you focused on bravery?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah. I think it’s something that I actively and consciously employ in my life every day as an anxious person. And it was the thing that I was seeing in Jess that resonated the most with me. These dogs are so brave, they see something they want to do and they try it again and again and again until they can do it. And they self-regulate, that’s not an impulse that we have or if it is, it’s been overridden by societal things, but they will try something, get overwhelmed, go away, and then come back later on their own time and try it again. So I was watching all of these really admirable qualities in them and they just really spoke to me. So writing the book was amazing. Got to work with this extraordinary illustrator called Anna Pirolli, who over the course of nine months, brought Jess my dog to life in the most beautiful way and totally outstripped my expectations in their just lovely drawings that I will treasure for the rest of my life. And it was a joy to write. It kind of wrote itself. It’s based on true stories and incidents in Jess the dog’s life, but it’s about friendship and it’s about getting out of bed in the morning on a day where you don’t want to, and stepping out into the world with courage.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Amazing. And where can people purchase the book?

Jess Bolton:

On Amazon, in Waterstones Blackwells and My favorite: your local Independent bookshop.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Fantastic. Now you also have a podcast, it’s called Brave Little Podcast, which is about stepping out into the world with courage. Can you say more about why you wanted to start this podcast?

Jess Bolton:

Well, in true ADHD fashion, I just woke up one morning this summer and thought I’m going to make a podcast. And I did. But yeah, it’s a series where I sit down with people who you probably already know, love and admire, and I talk to them about the everyday situations that require courage of us. Things like making friends as an adult, which is inexplicably really hard and everybody seems to struggle with. So I talked to the incredible Sophie Butler about why that’s so difficult and how we can get around it. We also talk about things like letting go of other people’s opinions of you, which was a big one for me. And the day-to-day things that most of us struggle with that we might not necessarily want to talk about. We’re just opening up those conversations in a really frank and honest way.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And when, is it out now or when will it be out?

Jess Bolton:

It’s out now. So every Thursday until the end of the year, there’s an episode.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Fantastic. And lastly, I have also been following along on your running journey, watching you go from kind of taking your first runs and being nervous about it. And now you are running, doing a big run for charity. Can you talk about it and talk about your motivation to start running?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, absolutely. I started running in 2020 in lockdown out of an urgent necessity to get outside and cover some ground. And my uncle died at the beginning of the first lockdown. And my mom and I would go for these runs together where we would be out in the middle of nowhere and we would scream and we would cry and we would wave our arms around and cackle with laughter and just let out whatever was sitting on our chest that morning. And it was so fun and so liberating and I completely fell in love with running. And then this past October, my uncle died of pancreatic cancer, which has been a devastating thing to watch happen to my family. And this month, November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month. So I’m running 40 miles to raise money and awareness about pancreatic cancer. Currently 50% of people who are diagnosed die within 12 weeks.

Most people don’t get any treatment and only 7% of people survive pancreatic cancer. So I’d never heard of it until my uncle was diagnosed a couple of months ago, but it’s made me think, okay, I’m going to put this purple Pancreatic Cancer UK T-shirt on, and I’m going to get out there on the street and I’m going to run because I know that running will help me with my grief and it has being out in the fresh air and moving your body, it just felt like the right thing to do and I’ve been able to raise some money, which is fantastic.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And has it had an impact on your mental health?

Jess Bolton:

Yeah, a hundred percent. I knew it would. It’s one of those things you always know, but just being out in the mornings and watching the seasons change and when you’re going through grief, I think nature has a lot to offer in terms of comfort and reassurance. So there’s that, but there’s also the endorphins. It’s helping adjust my brain chemistry up a notch so that I’m not wallowing in these feelings and it’s given me a sense of purpose and drive at a time when I could just be on the sofa watching Gilmore Girls. It’s very tempting.

Le’Nise Brothers:

I love that. What do you have coming up next?

Jess Bolton:

Well, the big thing at the moment is the podcast. So we’ve released two episodes and there are five more to go, I think. That might be terrible maths on my part, but I’m hoping we might be able to continue that in the new year depending on how it goes.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Amazing. What thought do you want to leave listeners with today?

Jess Bolton:

I think the thing that’s with me at the moment is whatever’s weighing on you, whatever feelings you’re contending with, they’re probably a completely appropriate response to whatever’s happening around you. And the best thing you can do is find somebody you trust or somebody with authority and talk to them about it.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Thank you so much, Jess. Thanks for coming on the podcast and all the links to your podcast, your book will be in the show notes for our listeners to check out.

Jess Bolton:

That’s fantastic. Thank you, Le’Nise. It’s been lovely to chat to you.

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