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Stories I loved this week.

I’ve been talking a lot about self-care and ways to destress recently. It’s so essential. Here are five more ways to feel less stressed. (Healthyish) I love this profile of Oprah, especially this line, “When the shoot is finally over, I am taken to the […]

Are you more stressed than you realise?

How do you feel right now? Check your breath. Is it shallow, taking short, little breaths through your nose? Check your hands and teeth – are they clenched? Check your shoulders – are they tensed up towards your ears? If you answered yes to two […]

Stories I loved this week.

coffee break

Happy weekend! Here’s a round up of some of the interesting food, health and wellness articles I’ve read this week. Have you found an interesting study? Send it my way!

Just eat real food and eat mindfully. This interesting study shows that the common denominator between a good quality low-fat and low-carb diet is havingĀ vegetables all day long, as much as you can eat, having a salad every day, no added sugar and as little refined flour as you can get. (The Washington Post)

Changing what you eat (and drink) can help you respond better to stress. (The New Potato)

I’m a big believer in reproductive freedom, however this story underlies the importance of women doing proper research before they choose. The joking tone to a story ultimately about hemorrhaging and anaemia caused by a copper IUD is disturbing. (Refinery 29)

I love the cooking tips in this article, especially around really thinking about how you salt your food – it is through an actual salt or through salted foods like anchovies, capers or olives? (Food 52)

More reason to be mindful about the amount of fish you’re eating. (NY Daily News)

Who doesn’t love Ina Garten? (Epicurious)

This is a great recipe for fig season. (Bon Appetit)

Green Salads For Beginners

When people ask me for shortcuts for getting healthier and feeling better, I tell them two things. Firstly, that there are no shortcuts and health should be lifelong pursuit. Then, once I’ve stepped off my high horse šŸ˜Ž, I tell them to eat more vegetables. […]

Stories I loved this week.

Happy weekend!Ā Here’s a round up of a few of the nutrition stories I’ve found interesting this week. The microbiome is so fascinating. Did you know that every unbalanced microbiome is unbalanced in its own way? This is why a one sized fits all approach doesn’t […]

What’s your self-care routine?

flowers at kew

Self-care has become a hot topic these day, as people search for a way to keep grounded in what feels like crazy times.

Self-care, as in the act of taking small moments for yourself, in order to uplift, centre and increase energy, is not the selfish act it’s sometimes made out to be.

I had a big watershed moment last summer when I realised that I was doing too much and not taking care of myself enough. It was then I understood how important rest and a sense of peace are to my own self-love, self-care and ability to love others.

For parents especially, we’re guilty of neglecting our own self-care in service to our families, children and loved ones. I’m sure many of you can think of specific moments where you sacrificed something for yourself in order to give to your children, whether it be time, food or emotional energy. That’s par for the game as a parent.

But in order to keep doing that, we need to make sure we keep our own ‘cups’ full. That is, we make sure we are rested enough, nourished enough, energised enough and calm enough to keep giving.

That’s where self-care comes in. And to be clear, this has different manifestations for different people. For some people, self-care is being able to have 20 minutes of extra time in bed in the morning, for others, it could making sure that they can get to their spin class at lunchtime. It could be taking a long bath in the evening Ā or it could be noodling away at a piece of woodworking. It could simply be making the time to feed yourself nourishing food at every meal and eating it in a mindful way.

My self-care routine has evolved over the last few years. Now, for me, it means:

  • Being able to do some yoga (even if it’s just 10 minutes with my son jumping through my legs during downward dog) every day
  • Lighting my favourite Daylesford candle and enjoying the smell and the flame
  • Doing my deep breathing exercises when I feel overwhelmed
  • Having a little smooch with my husband
  • Having a big belly laugh with my son
  • Making meals from scratch at home and making sure there’s always something good to eat in the fridge

What do you do for self-care? Has your routine evolved or changed depending on what’s going on in your life?

Stories I loved this week.

We’re squeezing the last bits out of summer and starting to think about school. I can’t believe my little boy is about to go into his first year of school. I predict quite a few tears on his first day! I’d love a few tips […]

I Tried It: The Berkey Water Filter

If you live in a big city like London, you’ll be familiar with the annoyances of limescale and the need for some kind of water filter to reduce the hardness of the water. Our lightbulb moment came when we had friends over and saw that […]

How much water do you drink a day?

richmond bunting

Conventional wisdom suggests that we should drink at least 8 glasses of water a day, or about 1.5 – 2L. How much water do you drink a day?

For a lot of people, even drinking a litre of water a day is tricky. When I first my husband, he didn’t drink any water, but insisted that his 8 cups of milky, English Breakfast tea met his daily water requirement. I took me a while to convince him that tea is a diuretic šŸ˜³.

One thing to consider is that if you’re already eating a good portion of fruit and vegetables a day, you’ll also be getting the water in the produce, along with the fibre, micro and macronutrients too.

Some fruit and veg contain more water than others.

For example, 1 medium sized apple contains 86% water, whilst a slice of watermelon (the clue’s in the name!) is 97% water. Courgette, radish and celery are 95% water and cauliflower, peppers and spinach are 92% water. To contrast, a banana contains 74% water.

So if you’re eating 7 to 10 portions of fruit and veg a day, do you also need to be drinking 8 glasses of water a day?

As ever, it’s important to consider how you feel on an individual level and listen to what your body is telling you.

In general, if your pee isn’t clear or a light straw colour, then you probably need to up your water intake either through food or water itself. If you’re eating lots of fruit and veg that are high in water content and you’re still thirsty with dark pee, then you probably need to up your water intake. If you’re very active or outside on a hot day, it’s probably worth increasing your water intake.

Just as you can drink too little water and end up dehydrated, you can also drink too much water and end up with something called hyponatremia, where the cells become completely waterlogged, throwing the sodium-potassium balance in the cells off, which can be fatal. So the moral of the story: observe your body’s signs, consider how much fruit and veg you eat a day and tailor your water consumption to your own lifestyle and thirst.

And a note of caution: excess thirst can be a sign of diabetes, so if you’re experiencing this, I highly recommend going to see your GP.

How much water do you drink a day?

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How many portions of fruit and vegetables do you eat each day?

This isn’t a trick question! The NHS recommend at least 5 portions of fruit and veg per day and a recent study by Imperial College London went all the way up to 10 portions per day. Does that sound like a lot? Let’s put in […]

How To Manage PMS

  Do you dread the week before your period? How much do you dread it? I used to count down the days, waiting for the familiar aches in my back, bloated belly and throughly grumpymood. I used to think all women suffered this way and […]

Food and anxiety.

boats in minorca

It’s has only been in the last six months that I’ve properly considered the role that food has played in exacerbating my anxiety.

When I eat badly – too much sugary food, too much bread and pasta – I can feel my anxiety building – that tight, clenched feeling in my belly that causes me to grind my teeth, ball my fists and look for the nearest exit.

Have you made the connection between what you eat and your anxiety? There is growing evidence to support the connection between nutrition and mental healthĀ – the connection between dietary quality and mental health.

It seems like a no-brainer: the way you eat affects the way you feel. But like me, it can take a while to make this connection, and once you do, eating well almost feels like a revolutionary act, the act of giving a shit about what you eat and drink and how they make you feel.

We eat three times a day, maybe more. Food is powerful stuff. It’s medicine, it’s nourishment, it’s therapy, it’s the way we fuel ourselves to do what we need to do. When you fill your body full of good stuff, you give it the nutrients – the vitamins, the minerals – it needs to keep you going, but also to keep you feeling good.

A diet lacking in important nutrients like magnesium, iron, zinc, vitamin D, omega-3s and vitamin B6 can have a knock on effect on mood. It means you won’t be able to produce enough of the feel good hormones like serotonin and melatonin and if you are an anxious person, this can make your symptoms worse.

What do you eat? Have you considered the effects of what you eat and drink and how it effects your emotional and mental wellbeing?

Don’t forget to breathe.

In those moments of anxiety and panic, when your mind is racing, your heart is beating at 100 miles an hour and you’re not sure if you can get through the next 10 minutes, let alone the rest of the day, just breathe. Yes, this […]

Alcohol and anxiety.

It goes without saying, but of course I’ll say it anyway: Everyone’s anxiety manifests in different ways and you might be that unicorn that reads this and says, eh, this isn’t relevant to me. Great! I applaud you! For everyone else: let’s have a good […]

Stories I loved this week.

palm trees in menorca

After a long hiatus, I’m bringing back this weekly round up of things I’ve loved around the internet. There’s so much good stuff out there right now that I’m itching to share.

Do you put together a weekly budget for your family? I love this food budget diary series, mainly because it’s a great sneak peek into what people eat. (The Kitchn)

How to jazz up your scrambled eggs. Yum. (Bon AppƩtit)

Chromium is an incredible, underrated mineral. If you have big sugar cravings (especially in the late afternoon!), this is one to check out. (Well+Good)

I talk a lot about serotonin – it’s such a powerful happy hormoneĀ that we can boost through food and lifestyles. These are some great tips to keep your serotonin levels up. (Mark’s Daily Apple)

Have you been watching ‘Doctor in the House’ on the BBC? Personally, I love the approach on this show – a GP with a functional medicine approach spends two months working with individual patients to get to the root cause of what’s ailing them. The cases so far have been fascinating – definitely worth a watch. (BBC iPlayer)

And speaking of Dr. Chatterjee, the GP featured on Doctor in the House, he’s written a fantastic blog post about how diet can improve symptoms of depression. He says: “the nutrients you put in your mouth have a severe impact on your brain.” Wise words.

How to raise a feminist son. (New York Times)

Mindful eating can help weight loss. (The Guardian)