The Third Phase of The Menstrual Cycle: Ovulation

Photo by Rodrigo Borges de Jesus

For the last two posts, we’ve been talking about the first two phases of the menstrual cycle, the menstrual and the follicular phases.

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Are you finding that having this information is helping you understand better about what’s happening in your body? 

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I really feel empowered when I know what’s going on and I don’t have to guess. Do you? 

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Let’s move on to talking about the ovulatory phase, otherwise known as ovulation!

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So what’s actually happening when you ovulate?  

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Simply put, one of your ovaries releases a mature egg!  This is the big moment of your menstrual cycle and what the follicular phase has been building up to! 

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Your luteinising and follicle stimulating hormones are at their highest points, as is your oestrogen, which has risen to help thicken the endometrium, the lining of the uterus (the place where a fertilised egg will implant!). 

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For most women, their energy will be at its highest point and they’ll be raring to go! 

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Communication skills are at their peak during ovulation, so this is the time to schedule in that big presentation or important meeting with a boss or client. 

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Here’s a question I get asked a lot: how do I know when I’m ovulating? 

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There are two major signs to look for: 

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  1. Discharge: this tends to become more of an egg white consistency and can be whitish in colour 
  2. Temperature:if you track your cycle using the fertility awareness method (FAM), then you will see your temperature rising during this phase of your cycle

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Food wise, do you notice that you tend to crave fresh fruits and vegetables during this phase of your menstrual cycle? There’s a reason for this! 

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Eating a rainbow of fruit and veg helps support your immune system and keeps you as healthy as possible – your body wants to have the healthiest possible environment to fertilise the mature egg it’s just released!  

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Do you notice a boost in your energy levels and communication skills when you’re ovulating?  

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What do you think? Is there anything else you want to learn more about this phase of your menstrual cycle? 

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Next up: the final phase – luteal! 

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Are your hormones up and down? Do you want to talk more about ways to improve your hormone health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

Subscribe to weekly notes from our founder, Le’Nise!

The Second Phase of The Menstrual Cycle: The Follicular Phase

Photo by Diana Simumpande

In my last post, I took you through an overview of what happens during the first phase of the menstrual cycle, aptly called, the menstrual phase.  

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Did it help you understand a bit more about what’s happening during that time of your cycle? 

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Let’s talk about what happens next! 

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As you all know by now, I used to be be blissfully unaware of what happened in my cycle after my period ended.  All I cared about was that the terrible week of my period was over and I could get on with my life (and put the horrible period underwear away!).

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What I didn’t know is that what happens in the next phase sets up the groundwork for the rest of the menstrual cycle. 

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When we enter into the follicular phase (phase two of the menstrual cycle), our estrogen, testosterone and follicular stimulating hormone  (FSH) begin to increase again in preparation for ovulation (i.e. your body is getting ready to release an egg). 

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Do you feel an increase in your energy levels around this point?

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That increase in energy is connected to  rising hormones, preparing us to get out of the house, get social and look & feel our best! You might find that you get quite horny around this time too! Yeah!

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For many women, this is the time of their cycle when they feel their most vibrant, energetic and like their best selves. 

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Your confidence is at all time high so if there’s anything you’ve been hesitant about, try it now

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You also may feel more creative and the rising testosterone also means that you’ll be up for more risk taking and trying new things.

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Have you noticed this come up for you? 

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There’s a lot going on in your body during this phase of your cycle, so nourishing your hormones with lots of dark leafy greens and brassicas really helps (and the fibre keeps you regular!).

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Grass-fed beef & lamb are also superstar foods during this phase – they help replace the iron that has been lost during menstruation and can keep your energy levels high too! 

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What do you think? Is there anything else you want to learn more about this phase of your menstrual cycle? 

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Share your questions about the follicular phase of your cycle in the comments below!

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Next up: ovulation, or when one of our ovaries releases an egg! 

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Are your hormones up and down? Do you want to talk more about ways to improve your hormone health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

The First Phase of the Menstrual Cycle: The Menstrual Phase

The Menstrual Phase of The Menstrual Cycle
Photo by Erol Ahmed

I didn’t learn much about my menstrual cycle when I was in school. Anyone else in a similar position?

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What I did learn about my cycle, I cobbled together from books, magazines (shout out to Sassy magazine!), chats with my girlfriends and eventually, some pretty serious googling when I was trying to get pregnant. 

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I often think about how great it would have been to learn about all of this much earlier. To learn that there are four phases to the menstrual cycle. Or that the menstrual cycle isn’t just about getting a period.  Or that ovulation is a hugely important part of it. Or that what you do in the 60 -90 days before your current menstrual cycle will have an effect on it. 

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Over the next few posts, I want to breakdown each of the four phases for you. 

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Are you with me? 

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Let’s start with the menstrual phase, which starts on day one of your period.

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During this phase, if you haven’t fertilised an egg in the previous cycle, your body takes this time to shed the lining of the uterus.  This is the menstrual bleed and typically can last between 4 – 7 days. 

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What’s happening with your hormones during this phase, because let’s face it: there’s always something happening in this area! 

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Estrogen (the hormone that controls the menstrual cycle) and progesterone (the hormone that is released after ovulation) are at their lowest points, so you might feel a bit low with not a lot of energy. 

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You might feel discomfort, pain, a lack of energy, a bit moody or that your emotional responses are a bit more heightened., i.e. you might get teary at a random TV advert. 

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Socially, you might find that you withdraw a little bit from activities or you want to stay at home, especially on day 1 & 2 of your period.  

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All of this is completely normal and part of the ebb and flow of our menstrual cycle.  

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What’s not normal is having lows that are too low, excessive bleeding or pain that is too much.If you feel like this, I would encourage you to explore what’s going on and work with a professional (like me!)to get to the bottom of it. 

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Interestingly, research shows that evaluation and analytical skills are at their strongest during this part of the menstrual cycle, so it’s a great time to take a step back, take stock and reflect on where you are in your life / career / etc. This would be a great time to schedule a call with a mentor or coach if you feel emotionally up to it. 

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It’s so fascinating to see that once you understand what’s going on during your period, you can start to listen to your body and connect more, rather than fighting it. 

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So many of us have negative feelings about our periods and I would love to encourage you to let go of that and find ways to be positive. If positivity is a step too far, then at least try a little bit less negativity. 

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Food, breathwork and movement  (I had to talk about this –  I’m a nutritionist & yoga teacher!) are incredible ways to support your body during this phase of your menstrual cycle.

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Listening to your body, remembering to breathe acknowledging the type of movement & food you crave and nourishing it with nutrient packed fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, complex carbohydrates and good fats will have only positive effects. 

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What do you think? Is there anything you want to learn more about this phase of your menstrual cycle?

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Look out for my post about the next phase of the menstrual cycle!

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Are your hormones up and down? Do you want to talk more about ways to improve your hormone health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

The 2018 Eat Love Move Happy Hormone Holiday Gift Guide, Part 2: To Help Balance Your Hormones

We’re a week away from Christmas. Are you ready?  I’m still getting those last minute gifts and hoping for a little gift inspiration for a few of my loved ones that are a little bit more difficult to buy for. 

The 2018 Eat Love Move happy hormone health holiday gift guide

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Part one of my happy hormone holiday gift guide was dedicated to a few different products that will help you or your loved ones go plastic-free (or just use a little less).  Have a look if you need a little inspiration! 

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This gift guide is dedicated to gifts that help support hormone balance and help reduce that amount of harmful chemicals going into the body through makeup, cleaning products, skin care or cooking utensils. 

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Happy shopping! 

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Lodge Cast Iron Pan 

I adore my Lodge cast iron pan and cook most things in it, from ragu sauce to pancakes to chilli. The trick is make sure to oil the pan and clean it properly. Do this and it will last for ages (and food won’t stick!). My cousin uses a cast-iron pan she inherited from our grandfather – he bought it at least 50 years ago! 

The other benefit of a cast iron pan? You avoid the hormone disrupting chemicals that make non-stick pans not stick. 

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Intey HEPA Air Purifier

This air filter is a lovely gift for the winter months when most of us don’t open the windows in our home as often as the summer, so the air gets stale and potential allergens like animal hair and mould hang around longer than they should, putting extra strain on the body’s various detoxification functions. 

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RMS ‘Un’ Cover Up


This is the perfect way to introduce a loved one to non-toxic, natural makeup. The RMS range, designed by Rose-Marie Swift, a make-up artist is made from non-allergenic, environmentally friendly ingredients and avoids the ones that are likely to disrupt hormones. I use this cover-up everyday and it goes on beautifully and the coconut oil in it makes it very moisturising. 

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Living Nature Natural Lipstick

Did you know that many lipsticks contain high levels of lead and other heavy metals? And because it’s applied on the lips, a lot of it is often swallowed. Happily, there are many natural, non-toxic alternatives on the market, including this fabulous lipstick by Living Nature, a New Zealand based natural beauty brand. 

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Nutiva Organic Coconut Oil 


I had to include my favourite coconut oil brand on this list. This coconut oil is a beautiful moisturiser for the skin and hair and absorbs very well, which is one of my biggest issues with coconut oil. Some brands leave the skin looking very shiny! This one doesn’t and smells great too. 

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Afro Skin and Beauty Natural Hair and Skincare

This is a wonderful brand, selling high quality natural hair and skin care.  It’s always nice to support small businesses, especially at this time of year, so definitely check out this company! 

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Dr. Bronner’s Sal Suds Natural Cleaning Soap


Have you considered making the shift to natural cleaning products? Dr. Bronner’s are a great brand that make very versatile natural cleaning and body care products. And their labels are chockfull of instructions on exactly how to make your own cleaning spray. 

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Amber Glass Cleaning Bottles


These amber glass spray bottles are a lovely way to store a homemade cleaning spray. You could make up a few bottles and give them a Christmas gifts! 

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Are your hormones up and down? Do you want to talk more about ways to improve your hormone health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

The 2018 Eat Love Move Happy Hormone Holiday Gift Guide, Part 1: To Go Plastic Free (Or Just Use A Little Bit Less)

Two weeks until Christmas! Are you ready? I’m not… at all. I’m going to be doing a lot of last minute shopping this year! 

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For those of you that are on the last minute shopping vibe like me, I’ve put together a few gift guides with lots of ideas that will arrive in time for Christmas and will help your loved ones support their hormone health.  

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Part one of this gift guide has lots of gift ideas to help reduce plastic or even begin to go plastic-free. 

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Happy shopping! 

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Redecker Dishwashing Brush 

Ditch the disposable dishwashing sponges and make the switch to these sturdy dishwashing brushes, made from wood and natural plant fibres. 

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Bee’s Wrap Beeswax Wraps 

I’ve been using this clingfilm alternative for the past year and I have to admit, I was pretty skeptical at first. I didn’t see how they would be able to replace the durability of clingfilm. But then I started tracking how much clingfilm we were using and reminding myself how little of it gets recycled. Once you get the hang of these wraps and the different sizes, you’ll never go back to clingfilm! 

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Diva Cup Menstrual Cup

I made the switch to menstrual cups a few years ago and now, I would never go back to using tampons or menstrual pads. I wrote about my experience here, if you’d like to know more about the ins and outs of using a menstrual cup. From an environmental view, making the switch to a menstrual cup reduces your environmental footprint (the average woman throws away over 200kg of menstrual products in their lifetime!)

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Reusable Metal Straw

Many restaurants, bars and coffee shops have started to make the switch from plastic to paper straws, which is a positive step. By carrying around your own metal straw you help reduce waste and avoid the need for a disposable straw at all! 

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Reusable Bamboo Cutlery Set

If you have the metal straw, you might as well go all the way and get a full reusable bamboo cutlery set, complete with fork, knife, spoon, chopsticks and a bamboo straw. This would be a great gift for a friend that eats many lunches ‘al desko’ 😀

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Klean Kanteen Stainless Steel Water Bottle


These are such a lovely, thoughtful gift. So many of us want to increase the amount of water we drink (and rightly so!), but it can be easy to forget to fill up your water glass in the morning. These stylish water bottles take up to 800ml at a time and are light enough to slip into a rucksack when you’re out and about. 

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Lock and Lock Glass Food Storage Containers 

Over the last two years, I’ve gradually replaced all of our old hand me down plastic tupperware with these brilliant glass food storage containers. Yes, they’re glass, so you have to be careful with them, i.e. don’t just fling them into the sink like me, because they break 🤔

Acne? But I’m not a teenager!

Adult acne. An oxymoron? No, unfortunately not.

 

It’s something that afflicts more and more adult women as we move from our teens and 20s into our 30s and 40s. In the UK, nearly 90% of teenagers have acne and half of them continue to as adults. Are you one of them?

 

If so, don’t despair. From personal experience, I know that adult acne can have an effect on self-esteem and confidence, feeling like people are looking at your spots, rather than at you. Let me assure you that most people get a few spots from time to time. They seem to be a by-product of our hectic lifestyles and the food and drink we use to keep us going.

 

Why do we get acne and how can we can rid of those pesky spots?

 

Acne can be caused by a number of factors, from too much coffee, alcohol, sugar and stress, to poor gut health to an imbalance of sex hormones. It’s hard to generalise because the causes vary so widely.

 

Here’s another way to look at acne: it’s a symptom of something else going on in your body. Yes, you may get spots, but that’s your body’s way of telling you that there’s something else happening that you need to address.

 

Here are four things that can help improve the health of your skin.

 

1. Think about what you’re putting on your skin.

Everything we put on our skin gets absorbed by our blood stream. This is why some medications are more powerful when they’re applied as creams, sprays or gels, rather than taken as a pill. Make-up, skincare and household cleaning products are all absorbed by your skin and can disrupt the way your body makes oestrogen, which can lead to hormone imbalance, which can then lead to acne.

 

2. Introduce more fermented food and drink into your diet.

Fermented food and drink such as kombucha, kefir, kimchi and sauerkraut have many good bacteria, which support the health of your gut. Positive changes to the health of your gut have positive effects on the health of your skin, by affecting the skin microbiome (the balance between good and bad bacteria on your skin).

 

3. Eat more good fats.

Foods with good fats such as oily fish, avocado, nuts and seeds, olive and coconut oils help support the health of the skin by reducing the inflammation that can create acne.

 

4. Work on reducing your stress levels.

Stress can contribute to blood sugar imbalance, inflammation and sex hormone imbalance. Find something you can do everyday that helps you manage day to day stress. Anything from taking a deep breath from your belly to being outside in nature to finding ways to saying no can all help manage stress, which can then have a positive effect on skin health.

 

Do you have acne? Do you want to talk more about ways to improve your skin health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Six ways to improve your health and wellbeing for free (or close to it!)

 

Fancy powders and expensive exercise classes are great, but you don’t need these to be feel or be healthy. I worry that people feel like they can’t be healthy unless they have a lot of money. It doesn’t have to be this way!

 

Here’s the thing: there are loads of things that can be done for free or not that much money that can contribute to your health and well-being.

 

Here are six things you can do to improve your health and wellbeing that are free (or close to it!)

 

  1. Eat more vegetables. Farmers markets and market stalls have a variety of veg that doesn’t need to cost the earth.
  2. Get more and better sleep
  3. Move your body everyday
  4. Breathe
  5. Get rid of emotional vampires
  6. Drink water

 

How many of these do you do each day? Check out my IGTV video where I go into detail about each point. 

 

Do you want to talk more about your health and wellbeing? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

 

Photo by Bruno Nascimento on Unsplash

Is wellness for everyone?

I worry that many people feel health and wellbeing isn’t for them because they don’t have a lot of money for expensive ingredients, classes, crystals or workout gear. Or they don’t see anyone that looks like them speaking about health and wellbeing topics that are relevant to them.

 

This is why I believe it’s so important to have voices in the health and wellbeing industry that have a different cultural point of view and come from different backgrounds, be it race, age, body shape or ability.

 

By opening up the conversation to other people from different backgrounds, we widen the scope of what wellness means and the tools to achieve this. 

 

This means acknowledging that not everyone can afford expensive ingredients or has the luxury of time to make long and complicated recipes. 

 

It means acknowledging the history and cultural context of the wellness trends such as yoga, meditation, matcha and Ayurveda. 

 

It means acknowledging that certain health topics such as menstruation, fertility and childbirth have different cultural and religious contexts that must be addressed in order to move the conversation forward. 

 

It means acknowledging that some might be intimidated by going into a fitness class, feeling as though they don’t have the right body / skin colour / brand of leggings / etc. 

 

It means acknowledging the racial disparities in health outcomes, especially in the UK and the US. 

 

What do you think about diversity in wellness? What else needs to be discussed? 

 

Do you want to talk more about your health and wellbeing? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

 

Photo by Nick Grant on Unsplash

Happy gut, happy hormones!

How much do you know about what’s going in your gut?

 

We have millions of microbes there, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. All of them have a good and bad element and they have an impact on our physical and mental health.

 

Our gut health, far from being something to be forgotten about, has a major impact on our hormone health.

 

That means that the gut microbiome, the collection of microbes, including bacteria, in our large intestine, has an effect on how you feel throughout your menstrual cycle.

 

Interesting, isn’t it?

 

The gut microbiome is connected to the estrobolome, the collection of bacteria that helps us metabolise estrogen. Or in a nutshell: good gut health can support good hormone health.

 

So how do you improve the health of your gut?

 

Eat more vegetables!

 

Fibrous vegetables and fruit support gut health, as do fermented food and drink, such as sauerkraut, kombucha, kefir,  kimchi and picked vegetables.

 

What do you do to support your gut health?

 

Do you want to talk more about your hormones and gut health? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

Do you have a normal period?

Who knows a normal period feels like?

 

In my work with women of different walks of life, I see a general perception that periods are supposed to be painful, emotional and annoying.
It’s frustrating because periods don’t have to be this way!

 

A healthy period should be relatively pain-free, apart from a few aches, non-disruptive and generally an event that you notice every month, but one that doesn’t cause a huge amount of upheaval.

 

So what is a normal period?

 

Here are 5 questions to ask yourself to figure out what’s going with your period.

 

1. Am I in a lot of pain?

A painful period is a sign that something else is going on, especially debilitating pain.

 

2. Am I bleeding heavily for my whole period?

Generally speaking, the first and second days of a period are the heaviest.

 

3. Am I bleeding for more than 7 days or less than 3 days?

Menstrual bleeds are generally between 3 – 7 days long. Anything shorter or longer can be a sign of hormonal imbalance, nutrient deficiency or a symptom of another issue.

 

4. Do I have heavy clotting?

Heavy clotting is generally associated with heavy bleeding and can be linked with another issues such as endometriosis, fibroids, polyps, PCOS, ovarian cysts or hormone imbalance.

 

5. Do I get very, very tired and lethargic for my entire period?

It’s normal for energy levels to dip in the first few days of a period. They’ll start to rise again towards the end of a period as the body moves into the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. If energy levels stay low, with a feeling of lethargy and sluggishness, that can be a sign of nutrient deficiency or hormonal imbalance.

 

Do you want to talk more about what’s going on with your period? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review to talk about what’s going on with your menstrual cycle.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating.

 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause. 

 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!

 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

How does yoga help balance hormones?

How do you feel after you go to a yoga class?

 

Calmer? A bit more chilled out? 

 

Many studies have shown that yoga has calming effects on our nervous systems, hormones and psychological wellbeing, creating a blissed out feeling that lasts well past the end of a 45 minute class. 

 

That calming effect reduces the levels of cortisol in our bodies and takes us out of the flight or flight, stressed state. You know, that frenzied feeling where your never ending to-do list keeps cycling around in your head and you’re doing too many things at the same time. 

 

For women especially, studies show that yoga can improve the pre-menstrual luteal phase, reducing feelings of anxiety, depression and increasing feelings of relaxation and calm.

 

Because yoga is so beneficial in reducing cortisol levels, it can have a positive effect on reducing how we cope with stress on an ongoing basis. 

 

When we can get stressed, our cortisol levels increase, we go into a fight or flight state (think clammy hands, dry mouth, rapid heartbeat and sweating) and this gives our brains a signal that it should make less progesterone and estrogen. 

 

When you’re in the fight or flight state, your brain is thinking – she’s stressed, she’s making loads of cortisol, she’s not going to be procreating any time soon, so I don’t need to make as much estrogen and progesterone. And this leads to hormone imbalance because your body isn’t making the right levels of estrogen and progesterone to keep the reproductive system, moods, energy, bones and skin in balance. 

 

Our bodies desperately want to be in equilibrium and want to get us back to a calm, restful state as much as possible. Modern life makes this hard, so this is where yoga comes in. The combination of dynamic movement and breathing regulates the breath, calms the mind and take the nervous system back to a state where you feel on an even keel. 

 

Breathing helps and there are quite a few specific poses that have a positive effect on the endocrine system – these are the organs that make hormones; the thyroid, the adrenals, the reproductive hormones and of course, the brain. 

 

Watch out for upcoming posts where I break down specific poses that support hormone balance. 

 

What’s your favourite calming yoga pose?

 

Do you want support to balance your hormones, reduce stress and stop mood swings?  Get in touch for a free 30 minute nutrition, hormone & menstrual health review to help clear the confusion.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach, trainee yoga teacher and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating. 
 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause.  
 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle! 

 

Research sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24298457
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25965108 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24138994 

 

Photo by Yayan Sopian on Unsplash

Deep Breathing To Support Hormone Balance

Hormones are a funny thing, aren’t they? 

 

When they’re in sync, we don’t worry about them. 

 

When they’re not, well, it feels a bit like our bodies are betraying us, doesn’t it? 

 

If you’ve been reading along for a while, you’ll know that there’s a lot that can be done to support hormone health  with nutrient dense food and high quality sleep.

 

And what about exercise?

 

Exercise is an amazing form of self-care and stress management that, in combination with consistent sleep and eating habits, can help bring balance to hormones like estrogen, progesterone and cortisol. 

 

And considering I’m more than halfway through my yoga teacher training, it would be remiss for me not to mention the incredible power of yoga to help balance hormones. 

 

The physical practice of yoga is beneficial of course, to help balance cortisol and adrenaline levels, however I really want to share the power of yoga breathing. 

 

Incorporating a few yogic breathing techniques into your day to day life can help reduce stress, which can have a positive effect on hormone balance.

 

Does the breathing technique help to calm you down?

 

 Let me know in the comments!

 

Do you want support to balance your hormones, reduce stress and stop mood swings?  Get in touch for a free 30 minute nutrition, hormone & menstrual health review to help clear the confusion.

 

Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach, trainee yoga teacher and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating. 
 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause.  
 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle! 

 

Going back to basics with nutrition.

big green salad

In my conversations with women from all walks of life, I often get asked about food and what to eat.  Not surprising, considering my profession 🙂

 

The question I get asked the most is usually phrased something like this: “what should I eat / what shouldn’t I eat / just tell me what I should be eating!”

 

There are so many different approaches to eating out there that all seem to be ‘the right thing to do’, from veganism to paleo to keto to 5:2 to low-fat to even just the idea of  ‘eating everything in moderation’.

 

No wonder there’s so much confusion about what to eat and what not to eat.

 

Here’s my take on it:

 

There’s no one sized fits all when it comes to nutrition. What works for you may not work for someone else and vice versa.  You know your body best, so it’s important for you to work out what works for you.
 

 

So before you jump into the latest approach to eating that everyone is talking about, there are some principles I’d love for you to consider:
 

1. Eat lots of vegetables every day, especially green leafy and cruciferous vegetables.

 

2. Eat a rainbow of fruit and vegetables.

 

3. Drink lots of water.

 

4. Eat and drink fermented foods.

 

5. If you eat fish, eat wild caught fish a few times a week.

 

6. Eat good fats such as avocado, olive oil, oily fish and nuts and seeds.

 

7. Be mindful about the way you eat sugar and drink caffeine and alcohol.

 

8. Eat the highest quality food that’s within your budget, leaning towards free-range, pastured and organic meat, dairy, fruit and vegetables whenever possible.

 

That’s it!

 

Of course it must be said that these principles need to be adjusted to your personal health circumstances and goals.  Broadly speaking, they can act as a good rule of thumb to cut through the confusion.

 

Are you confused about what to eat?  Get in touch for a free 30 minute nutrition, hormone & menstrual health review to help clear the confusion.

 


Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating. 
 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause.  
 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle! 

How To Use Your Menstrual Cycle To Your Advantage At Work


Do you ever wonder why there are times when you feel totally on top of your game at work and ready to tackle anything your clients or your boss throws at you?
 

And why there are other times when it’s a struggle to get anything done, let alone concentrate on that big project that needs to be finished by the end of the day?

 

It’s normal to have ups and downs in your energy levels and ability to focus, but did you know that there is a connection with how you feel and your menstrual cycle?

 

Learning to use our menstrual cycles and its four phases has the potential to give women a competitive advantage at work.

 

Yes, really! 

 

The menstrual cycle has been called the fifth vital sign, so understanding it and each phase can help women understand things like when the best time is to negotiate a pay raise, when we’ll be at the top of our game for a big new business pitch or when we may need to step back a little and do more reflection and analysis.

 

Here are the basics:

There are four parts to the menstrual cycle, with a full cycle lasting anywhere between 24-34 days. The primary female sex hormones, estrogen, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) will rise and fall depending on where a woman is in her cycle. The peaks and troughs in these hormones will also correspond with physical, mental and emotional  changes.

 

Knowing when these changes are likely to happen and harnessing them can give you an advantage in your work and personal life. Sounds good, doesn’t it?

 

Menstrual Phase

Day 1 of the menstrual cycle starts on the first day of your period, which can last anywhere between 3 – 7 days. It’s during this time of your cycle, the menstrual phase, that you may feel a bit tired and flat. Your energy may be low during this phase, but your evaluation and analytical abilities will be at their strongest, so it’s a good time to take stock and reflect on where you are in your life and your career. This would be a great time to schedule an appraisal or chat with a mentor.

 

Follicular Phase

Then we move on to the follicular phase, which lasts about 7 days. Your estrogen levels begin to increase, contributing to an increase in your energy and concentration. You may find that your creative juices are flowing. Use this time to try something new, whether it’s a course or new piece of client work.

 

Ovulatory Phase

Midway through your cycle, when you ovulate, your energy levels will reach their peak (along your estrogen & progesterone levels), so now’s the time to get that big project done or do that intricate task that needs a lot of focus. Your communication and negotiation skills will be at their strongest right now, so if you’ve been itching to do a talk or want to negotiate a pay rise, schedule it for this time of your cycle!

 

Luteal Phase

During the last part of the menstrual cycle, the luteal phase, you may find that your energy levels start to drop, especially as you get closer to your period. This is the time to lean hard on your routine, especially if you start to feel your mood start to drop.  Use this time to power through your to-do list and take action to complete something you’ve been procrastinating on.

 

Putting It Into Practice 

An easy way to start putting all of this into practice is to simply begin tracking your menstrual cycle, if you aren’t already. There are a wide variety of apps out there, so have a scroll through the app store and find the one that’s most intuitive to you and your lifestyle.

 

The information you’ll get from tracking your cycle will help expand your awareness of your body and knowing which of the four phases you’re in can help bring deeper understanding to why you’re feeling the way you are.

 

I see this again and again in my clients: when they listen to their bodies and have the knowledge to understand the messages they’re getting, they learn how to stay on top of their health. This improves their work lives and personal lives.

 

Understanding your menstrual cycle and its four phases can help you stay on top of your game at work and prioritise your tasks accordingly. Knowing what skills are likely to be stronger during each phase will give you an advantage that lets you can play to your strengths no matter where you are in your cycle.

 

Do you notice that certain parts of your job are easier depending on where you are in your cycle?  

 

Do you want to learn more about how to use your cycle to your advantage in your work and personal lives? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review to talk about what’s going on with your menstrual cycle.

 


Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating. 
 
They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause.  
 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle! 

 

Hormones 101: Progesterone

 

In the last post, I talked about estrogen, one of our two major female sex hormones.

 

Today, I’d like to have a closer look at progesterone, estrogen’s counterpart.

 

How much do you know about this essential female sex hormone? 

 

There’s often lots of discussion about estrogen, but not enough similar discussion about its partner hormone, progesterone.

 

Although progesterone is most closely associated with pregnancy and preparation for pregnancy, it is also important for a healthy menstrual cycle.

 

So what’s the deal with progesterone? 

 

The majority of progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum, a little structure that comes from the follicle of the egg that was released. This helps prepare the body for pregnancy if the eggs gets fertilised.

 

We also produce progesterone in very small amounts in the ovaries & the adrenal glands. In pregnancy, the placenta also produces progesterone.

 

If you think back to the four phases of the menstrual cycle,  your progesterone levels don’t stay the same throughout. 

 

They’re generally at their highest point a few days after ovulation, the halfway point of our menstrual cycle. Your progesterone levels drop  if you don’t fertilise an egg and are at the lowest point on the first day of our periods.

 

If the woman doesn’t get pregnant that cycle, the corpus luteum disintegrates, progesterone drops, and this is the signal for a woman’s period to start.  

 

If a women does get pregnant, then progesterone will help the blood vessels on the lining of the womb grow and stimulate glands that will nourish the embryo with nutrients.

 

It also prepares the womb for the fertilised egg to implant and helps maintain the pregnancy, rising all the way until birth.

 

So what else does progesterone do for us? 

 

Its other major function is to help regulate the menstrual cycle, so you want it to be balanced with estrogen.

 

When you have too little or much, you can experience PMS symptoms such as mood swings, insomnia, bloating, blood sugar imbalance, anxiety, acne and cramps.  Check out my post on the 5 Types of PMS to learn more.

 

Do you notice the ups and downs of progesterone across your cycle? 

 

Have you noticed it dropping as you approach perimenopause and menopause?

 

If you have questions about progesterone  and feel like you don’t know what’s going on with your progesterone levels, get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone & menstrual health review.

 


Le’Nise Brothers is a nutritional therapist, women’s health coach and founder of Eat Love Move.

 

Le’Nise works primarily with women who feel like they’re being ruled by their sugar cravings, mood swings and hormonal acne & bloating. 
 

They want to get to grips with heavy, missing, irregular & painful periods, fibroids, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, post-natal depletion and perimenopause.  
 

Her mission is for women to understand and embrace their hormones & menstrual cycle!