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Period Story Podcast, Episode 87, Ceri Jones: Food Doesn’t Need To Be Complicated To Taste Good

My guest on today’s episode is Ceri Jones, a food educator, chef and author of the new book It Starts With Veg: 100 Seasonal Suppers and Sides

In this episode, Ceri shares: 

  • Why she feels so open and free about talking about her period 
  • The career transition she made from managing orchestras to becoming a chef and food writer 
  • The joy she finds in cooking and helping others learn to cook
  • How an in person class can help anyone feel less intimidated by cooking 
  • How her new book can help you get to grips with seasonal eating
  • A few tips and tricks for choosing the best quality veg when you’re out grocery shopping 
  • The process of writing a cookbook (including the costs!)
  • And of course, the story of her first period 

Ceri says that food doesn’t need to be complicated to taste good and starting with simple things is a great way to feel less intimidated in the kitchen. She says that a lot can be done with garlic and salt and one or two spices, the squeeze of lemon juice at the end, and adding lots of fresh herbs into your cooking. 

Thank you, Ceri!

Get in touch with Ceri:

Her book:  It Starts With Veg: 100 Seasonal Suppers and Sides

Website: http://cerijoneschef.com

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cerijoneschef/

TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cerijoneschef


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SHOW TRANSCRIPT

Le’Nise Brothers:

Hi Ceri. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. I’m really excited to talk to you, hear about your book, but first let’s kick off by you telling us the story of your very first period.

Ceri Jones:

Okay. So firstly, thanks for having me on. And second, I got my period I think when I was 12. So I was in year eight in secondary school, which I think is a fairly average, normal time to get your period. So that was all cool. I was at home, so that was really handy. And I remember just noticing that I had something in my knickers and I went and told my mum and I think I’ve started my period and she was like, oh, okay. And then led me to the bathroom to show me where the stuff that she had was. And yeah, that was it.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Did you know what it was when it arrived? Was this a big surprise or did you kind of just roll with it?

Ceri Jones:

I think I just rolled with it. So I’ve got an older sister who’s two years older than me, so she’s started her period quite a few years prior. So obviously that made me aware of it. And we’d had sex education and so I knew all about periods and I think some of my friends had started by that point. So it was just, alright, it’s my turn now, it’s come to me. So yeah, I remember thinking, being obviously quite embarrassed, cos it’s an embarrassing thing. And the whole, I think I’ve started my period and I had family around. But yeah, so I guess I was quite lucky with the way that that happened when I was at home and it was easy to ask mum and all of that.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And then what was your experience of your period as you went into your teenage years?

Ceri Jones:

Mum first gave us pads and I was like, Ugh, these are horrible. I hate it. So I very quickly after that was like, okay, I’m going to start using tampons. I did quite a lot of sport. I was always like, I want to be able to do that without worrying. And my period was pretty much throughout my teenage years, not too heavy. I’ve always suffered with cramps quite a little bit. But yeah, I had an okay relationship with it. It was all right.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah. Okay, then what about now? What’s your relationship with your period now?

Ceri Jones:

I hate it. I think most, well maybe not most adults, but I think, yeah, I’m in my forties now, so I’m aware that things are changing with that. But yeah, just the cramps are pretty annoying and working out how that’s going to affect your life. Is it going to be here or see, I just released a book. I literally got my period the day of my book launch and I did a supper club at the weekend and I literally had my period for that as well. And you’re like, this is not, if I was going to design my life, it wouldn’t be in this way. You’d have it in the middle of the month when you’re feeling great. I think I’ve learned quite a lot about, there’s been lots of talk over the last few years and I know you talk about a lot about harnessing your cycle and when you’re best, and I understand that, but sometimes it’s completely impossible to schedule your life in a way where you are doing your best things when you’re feeling at your best. So that’s a bit annoying, but there’s nothing you can do about it, you just kind of have to roll with it.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, I guess the other way to look at it is you released your book and that’s like a new beginning and your period, it’s the beginning of a new cycle. I love reframing things, so that’s another way to look at it. And so you don’t really like it, you hate, you said you hate it. It is quite painful. What are some of the things that you do to manage your period?

Ceri Jones:

I have a really good ibuprofen.

I was just always making sure that I’ve got that with me and trying to take rest where you can and hot water bottles and stuff like that and just honouring how your energy levels are. And I’m quite happy about telling people I’m on my period, so I’m quite tired today to my colleagues or I’m a bit crampy, this is why I’m a bit aggy today. But yeah, I think it’s just trying to roll with it, but also making people aware because I think obviously half of the population go through this every single month, or just. And that’s a lot for us just to everyone be suffering in silence. I think if you are struggling a little bit to kind of tell people and people can give you a bit of a break.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And it’s interesting how open you are about telling people that you’re on your period because the world of chefs, it’s actually, when you think about it, well on the surface it seems like quite a male world and perhaps not in the setting that you work in. So being a female coming into this space and then just being very open about what you’re experiencing is actually quite refreshing.

Ceri Jones:

Alright. I mean, I think, I don’t work in a professional kitchen with males, so maybe my experience would be different if I do that. And actually, I was thinking about this before today I’ve been in quite a female dominated environment for most of my life. I went to a all female secondary school and lived with girls at university. I’ve worked in the arts sector for a lot of my life as well, which has been quite female dominated. So I’ve never been around that kind of really strong male environment. So maybe that is the reason why I feel so open and free I guess. But I’m quite an honest person anyway, so if I’m feeling something I’ll just tell people I know there’s no holding back ever.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, and that’s interesting. So female secondary school working, you had this, you went then were working in music, managing orchestras, and then you had a transition into the food world. And I love hearing these stories of transitions, career transitions, having done it myself. And I’m really interested in whether there was a light bulb moment for you where you were working in your music career and you thought, okay, I’m ready to do something different.

Ceri Jones:

I wouldn’t say there was one light bulb moment, there was probably about a hundred of them over the course of the two years in the main, it was a very slow transition for me. I didn’t suddenly just wake up one day and went, I’ve had enough of this, I’m moving on. It was just this slow realisation that I wasn’t really enjoying my job in the way that I’d had done previously. And it was a very complicated time for me. My mum had just died and prior to that, prior to her getting out, I’d already started writing about food and getting interested in that. And I guess that was an escapism from my job that I’d been in for 10 years. So everything and that felt quite safe and comfortable and comforting for me, but also wasn’t maybe inspiring me in the same way that it used to because it was no longer new. So sometimes now I still wonder if I hadn’t been through this traumatic life change at that I was 30 at the time, whether I still would’ve moved into food or whether it still would’ve been a hobby. But I love what I do now and I guess that’s just the way that things turned out for me. I don’t really know what the alternative would’ve been. Maybe I still would’ve been happy in music. I don’t.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, it really is one of those sliding door moments where, because I had a similar experience in that I got pregnant, it wasn’t in a bereavement for me, but I got pregnant and it made me think, okay, well what do I want to do next? I’m really interested in doing something different. And I do sometimes think what would’ve happened if I had stayed in that career? I have this totally different life now. What would’ve happened? I know I would’ve done lots of interesting things in that career, but it’s funny to kind of think back on that sometimes.

Ceri Jones:

Yeah, you just don’t know, if you’d have made a slightly, and as I said, it wasn’t a snap decision, it was lots of people over a long period of time telling me, I think you should leave. And me being scared to make that massive jump and then me realizing that I kind of was the only one who was able to make that decision, no one else could make it for me. And then that very, very slow transition. But who knows? Who knows? It’s what it is, and I love it what I do. So it’s all worked out fine.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah. And why food? What was it about working with food that you found interesting?

Ceri Jones:

I think the thing that I love the most about, it’s the creativity in creating things. And as a person with a musical background, so I’m a musician I’d say at my core and still play and that kind of being creative and food and you get to eat it and it nourishes you at the same time. And it’s just all of that together just I find really exciting. And most of the work I do these days is food education. So I’m helping people cook or we’re enjoying an experience of cooking together, which is just really joyful.

Le’Nise Brothers:

So food education, that’s really interesting because, so in the work I do as a nutritionist, there is some intimidation that I see from people around food. It’s intimidation of trying new things, fear of the kitchen, fear of going beyond a recipe. And I think if you go on to TikTok or Instagram, food content is so popular and you see people making these amazing things, but then when you talk to people, they just are like, I can never do that. And what would you say to someone who has that feeling of just feeling a little bit intimidated by cooking or freestyling? Are there any tips that you can share that would help unlock the magic of the kitchen for them.

Ceri Jones:

I’d tell them to come to a cooking class with me? I think going to an actual live in person cooking class is a really good way, as long as you’ve got the right tutor who helps you sort of break down those barriers. But starting with simple things, I think sometimes a lot of the problem with the content online is that it’s created visually rather than by what it tastes like. And I’ve just written a recipe book and people send me photos all the time of, a lot of my friends and family of photos of dishes that they’ve cooked and they nothing like the way that I make them. And there are no photos in the book for them to compare them to. But it’s always a good reminder that it actually doesn’t really matter how it tastes. I think if people are intimidated that their food doesn’t look like the food that’s been styled and produced within an inch of its life on TikTok and Instagram, that that’s okay.

Sometimes I think maybe I should be a bit more realistic with my plating up and try and not make it quite so perfect because then that will take away the edge of perfection. It doesn’t have to be perfect. And some of the best dishes are really ugly. Food can sometimes be a bit brown, and so then we break it up with herbs, but then sometimes that doesn’t make culinary sense or scattering pomegranate seeds over everything when that doesn’t need to be there. So I think maybe some bit more realism is needed, but to encourage people that they don’t need to have that perfection in the way things look as long as they taste good. And I find that through my classes really help people work out how to make their food taste good. So we always look at knife skills and everything, but I talk about seasoning to taste and tasting your food as your cooking constantly because I felt like before I did my chef training, that wasn’t something I’d ever learned to do or really knew was important. And I think that’s what’s helped me elevate my cooking.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, yeah. You mentioned knife skills and I went on a knife skills class. I went to Leith’s in Shepherds Bush.

Ceri Jones:

Amazing.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And I did a knife skills class there. And honestly it made such a difference because, and I know this sounds silly, but things like how often you sharpen your knives, it really makes a difference in the way that you, not only the way you chop food, but the ease that you feel while you’re prepping the meal because you’re not kind of stumbling around the ingredients and kind of stabbing the food so hard trying to cut it. And I think that’s such a simple thing and being able to have the tools that you need around you and you don’t need many things. I mean, often I hear people say, you just need one or maybe two really good knives and that’s all it takes to at least do the prep of a great meal. What about ingredients? So we’ve had this explosion of different ingredients, like you think of Ottolenghi and him bringing in some of the kind of Middle Eastern ingredients and we see lots of South American influences now. What would you say to people who are thinking, I want to make my food a little bit more exciting? What’s an easy way for them to unlock that?

Ceri Jones:

I think yeah, maybe buying a new cookbook of somebody’s like Ottolenghi or someone who cooks foods from a different region around the world and trying a couple of recipes and trying to understand and unlock the secrets in how they’ve flavored their food. So I’m really confident and comfortable with Mediterranean cuisine, coming up with dishes without having to check that. I wouldn’t just write a curry recipe or something from South America because I’ve never been there. And I see the spices and I understand how they’re used, but I don’t kind of understand that cuisine from a core. And so I try not to cook from cuisines where I don’t feel like I quite understand the nuances of the spices. So I would say, yeah, buying a cookbook and trying to cook your way through it might do that. But I think a lot can be done with garlic and salt and one or two spices, the squeeze of lemon juice at the end, and adding lots of fresh herbs into your cooking, which is one of my favourite things to do. I don’t think it needs to be complicated to taste good. And if your ingredients are really good to start with, they don’t really need much doing to them either.

Le’Nise Brothers:

So speaking of ingredients, so your cookbook, which came out last month, so It Starts With Veg: 100 Seasonal Suppers and Sides really focuses on ingredients, the seasonality of ingredients. Can you talk a little bit about why you decided to focus on seasonal eating?

Ceri Jones:

So when I did my chef training, which was 11 years ago, one of the key, so I went to a chef school in California, which made perfect sense at the time, and I think now that was quite a mad thing for me to do. But one of the cores of what, the pillars of how we choose our food was seasonal eating. And obviously seasonal eating is massive now and everybody, there’s much more understanding of what that is. But I really feel like 11 years ago maybe because the internet and Instagram wasn’t really quite so big as it is now, no one was really doing that. And I was buying courgettes in January and cooking with them, and I had no concept that wasn’t, I just didn’t really think about it. It wasn’t something I’d learned. And so through my chef training and obviously all the work I’ve done subsequently, it just felt like, it just makes complete sense. Why would you not eat stuff? Why would you eat courgettes in January? They’re not picked and grown then and it just doesn’t make sense.

Yeah. So I been trying my hardest over the last however many years to cook seasonally, and I’d always wanted to write a cookbook. I’d been on my to-do list since I was in my old job and I’d first started writing about food and trying to work out a way to bring all of my recipes and ideas into a cookbook sort of came up with this idea. And I quite like the idea that the book’s sort of a bit more of an encyclopedic kind of way of, it’s not an encyclopedia, it’s a cookbook, but a way of looking at a huge range of vegetables to help give you a really broad understanding of more than courgette, tomato and pepper. There’s so much more than that. And giving you a guide to use all of those.

Le’Nise Brothers:

So with the process of writing a cookbook itself, so having written a book, I have a few recipes in my book, but I thought if I had to expand this into an entire cookbook, it would be an entirely different process to the one that I had writing my book. Can you talk a little bit about the process of writing a cookbook?

Ceri Jones:

Yeah. So before you, usually, depending on who you wrote before, you have a cookbook commissioned, you’d have written a proposal, which when you’re writing fiction, you usually write the entire book and send that off to agents and publishers. But with nonfiction, you usually write a proposal. Mine’s about 50 pages, which is actually quite a lot where you outline what the book’s going to cover and you break down your chapters. And I did include in mine a list of all the recipes that I was going to include. So at that point, which was about three years ago now, I sat down over a couple of days and just brainstormed all the recipe titles. So I looked through all my archive of recipes on my website and Instagram and from all my catering work that kind of fit into that model and came up with loads of new ideas or recipes that I’d always wanted to create, wanted to create, but had never had the chance to because there’s only so many days in the week.

And then put that together. And then I cooked about 10 of them, photographed them and included all of that in the proposal with all the written out recipes. And then when you finally come to start the book, you’ve already got that framework to start with. So the whole a hundred recipes feels much less intimidating. And even as you are developing and going through and the whole writing process, you’re not starting from scratch, then I can imagine that would be completely overwhelming. And you’d start with your recipe type. And different people have different ways of writing cookbooks. Some people do all the writing, then all the testing. I did them both at the same time. So I’d come up with a recipe idea, look at three or four at the same time, test them, write them up, move on to the next section and keep going rather than having days on end sat on your bottom writing and then days on end in the kitchen, it was kind of, I combined it in one because that was the way that I felt I would work best. So yeah, it was really fun, but a lot.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah. And just from a logistical point of view, so once you actually got the book deal and you were in that process of writing and recipe testing, how does it work in terms of, and maybe I’m going into the weeds a little bit, but I’ve always been really curious about this. Does a publisher fund all of the kind of ingredients or you have to cover that cost yourself?

Ceri Jones:

No. Yeah, it depends on your deal that you’ve worked out with your individual publisher. And I can imagine if you are on your 10th recipe book and they’ve all been Sunday Times bestsellers than they might do, but it was my first book, so my advance was very modest and I was like, ah, okay. So yeah, I funded that myself out of the advance that I’d been given. I also applied to a fund in the Guild of Food Writers that I’m a member of from that covered some of my ingredients. But it was all the food that I ate over that period of seven, eight months of testing. So if you were writing a desserts cookbook, you’re not going to sit and eat a hundred desserts over that period. So writing a vegetable book where all the recipes are kind of health-minded ish, there’s quite a lot of cream and butter and cheese in there.

But it was like, well, yeah, I’m just going to eat this for my dinner. And there was a point where I had too much food leftover and you can’t freeze everything because a lot of the fresh things don’t work that way. So I gave them away. But because I work part-time, I test recipes on my days that I was not working and then I’d have a lunch for the day that I was working if I wasn’t teaching that day. So yeah, I spent a lot of money on it. I spent about a thousand pounds in ingredients. I kept on my receipts and totaled it up. Mostly I was interested if I wrote and write another book to having in mind how much money that would be. But that was my food bill. And yes, I spent more than I would’ve done on an average week on my food bill.

And you keep thinking, God, I’m spending more money. This is just, oh God, more money. I’m spending more money on ingredients and olive oil is like 10 pound a bottle now, but so that’s how it worked. But this is my experience, which might be completely different from somebody else’s in terms of how they approach it or how it’s funded. All the recipes in my book serve two people, which was something I was very passionate about doing. So there wasn’t a huge amount of food leftover, whereas if I’d been writing a family recipe book for four or six, you’d have a lot more because you have to test everything at the size of the portion that you’ve written for, otherwise you don’t quite know if it’s going to work in exactly the right way. So that was a bit of relief.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And what were your expectations for the book when you originally conceived of it? And now have those expectations changed now that the book has come out?

Ceri Jones:

I think, oh yeah, you try very hard not to have expectations, but at the same time, you obviously do. So the dream, I know everyone’s dream is to to be a Sunday Times bestseller, to be cooking on TV, to then immediately get another book deal and just be fabulous and have a flourishing career. But the reality is that doesn’t really happen for most people. And it is a journey. And I think reminding myself it’s a journey that I’m still on and may be on for quite some time. I might never get to the dizzy heights of all those things. But yeah, I’m trying to be realistic about it. You can only do so much, especially as a first time writer, it’s really hard. Yeah,

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, absolutely. But I think it’s really the achievement of actually having a book out there is something, I come back to that thought again and again, the internet, Instagram might go away, TikTok might go away, but having a hard copy book out there think’s just something that is really, really amazing. Someone can go to Waterstones or Foyles and get a copy of your book, off the shelf. 

Ceri Jones:

I know I to keep reminding myself that because you keep going. Oh, and the most maddest thing is all the people in my life, people I know well and people are cooking from it. And I’m like, I’ve been sharing my recipes on the internet for 12, 13 years at this point. I don’t think some people have ever cooked any of my recipes that in my close circle and they’re all cooking my food. And I’m like, well, this is why I wrote it, because I wanted to create these recipes that you’d find useful and you’d find tasty and just to give you different ideas and everything. So that is wonderful. And there’s something that’s just so special about, I always say a book is more a, it is a curation of recipes. So you can create stuff and put it on the internet, but it’s not curated as a theme. And that what’s so special about a book is bringing everything and all your ideas together in one place for people to dip in and out of. So yeah, it was great.

Le’Nise Brothers:

I remember last year there was this programme, on Channel Four with Jamie Oliver, and it was a competition. Did you watch it?

Ceri Jones:

Yeah, that was released at the same time that I was sending my proposal out. So it was like horrendous timing, but especially some of the really realistic advice they gave me. I was like, oh my God. So that was something that was weird timing. I think I’d watch it differently now than I did back then. But yeah, I was like, oh my God, this is, oh, this is harsh, but it worked out for me at the end, so we’re all right.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, it just really opened my eyes to how competitive the cooking and the cookbook space actually is and how people do buy cookbooks, but they’re a limited amount and how many cookbooks actually do get published in a year. But looking at their criteria for choosing the winners, I found it interesting because the person who won, I would’ve never picked them. It just didn’t make sense to me. But she seems to be doing really well. And I looked at the cookbook and it’s quite interesting, but that was interesting to see from a publishing open the kitchen and see behind the cupboards.

Ceri Jones:

Yeah, I think there’s a slight obsession that I did find in the programme there, slightly obsessed with the whole kind of niching and has having a unique idea. And we all know there are no unique ideas. You go into any branch of Waterstones and there are a gazillion cookbooks in there, or I thought my book was going to be unique. And then five other people have written a really similar book this year, not different recipes to mine, different structure, but have veg-centric cuisine. Let’s do this. And even a couple of books that were released last year and the year before that are quite similar, were all released after I’d already had mine commissioned. It’s just the way things go. So there is room in the market for people to write things on similar topics. And so trying to find that complete niche is impossible. But I think also what they’re looking for, which is what I would personally look for in a cookbook is, or a recipe writer, someone who really knows their craft of writing recipes, recipes that work, recipes that are realistic, recipes that aren’t difficult for people to do and all of that.

So they might have been looking for something different than the general public were looking for when they were watching that, which was a personality or a really crazy or something new idea. So you never really know what the publishers are looking for when they decide. But yeah, she’s doing really well, so it’s worked out for her.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah. So your book is about seasonal eating, starting with veg, and we’re in summer, we’re in the summer season right now. There’s all this amazing seasonal produce that’s available. What are some tips that you could give listeners when they’re actually going to the farmer’s market or the supermarket or the green grocers to get produce? What would they be looking for when they get to get the best quality and the best tasting fruit and veg?

Ceri Jones:

Well, I think if you’re at a farmer’s market, you can probably pretty much guarantee that everything will be good tasting. It generally is, especially if it’s not been sat on a shelf for a long time. And mostly with markets, you will find that stuff, especially farmer’s markets, that stuff is seasonal because that will have just been what’s been produced and is out there and there’s a real nuance to what’s seasonal. And it depends on the weather and the seasons and our climate’s changing at the moment. So that’s sort of changing the dates of seasons and stuff like that. So it can be confusing, but I am realistic. I do get a veg bag from a local farm who also sources stuff from all over the UK. But I do shop up in the supermarkets as well. I am not wealthy and I kow have a vague idea of what’s in season, but also like checking labels.

So most supermarkets on the price labels will tell you where I think they have to do on the packet, where things are from. So you look at your asparagus was the great example, and there’ll be a packet from Peru and a packet from Norfolk. So it is just trying to make that best decision that you can, and of course I will still eat courgettes in January from time to time. So there are always going to be exceptions to that rule. And I do a lot of kids cookery and a lot of the winter ingredients are really hard for children to chop. So we do tend to use softer tomatoes and peppers and courgettes out of season because otherwise we can’t do stuff. So I don’t strive to be perfect at all. It’s just really nice to try and focus on it the best we can. But yeah, and I guess if you’re shopping at farmer’s markets, looking for heritage varieties of fruit and veg that you might not see elsewhere, and I get really, I mean, it’s one of the things that drives me to buy produce in that way is just, I just think it’s really interesting to look at different varieties of food and those huge gorgeous heritage tomatoes that you get always taste amazing. Yeah.

Le’Nise Brothers:

And what about when you’re actually going and you’re touching the fruit and veg? Because I think now people stop doing that around Covid, but I have seen people actually starting to get that kind of feel for what they’re buying again when I’ve gone to the supermarket. Are there any tips that you could give people in that respect?

Ceri Jones:

Yeah, I guess it’s just making sure that something looks quite healthy. So I mean, I don’t really buy avocados very much anymore, but I would never buy them without touching them or feeling them that they were already soft. I know they would slightly give a little bit. And then things like stone fruit as well, which like avocados go on the turn really quickly. So it’s making sure that anything’s not already dark in color. Tomatoes another one, making sure the skin isn’t dimpled and that it looks nice and fresh. And potatoes haven’t started sprouting already. Just something you’ll know when it’s past its best before you buy it, which is one of the hard things doing online deliveries, which I do have to do quite a lot for my work. And the food arrives and you’re like, Ugh, I wouldn’t have picked that up past its best or not the size that I wanted. But yeah, it’s convenient sometimes. But yeah, I generally do pick stuff up and check it over before putting it in my basket just to make sure that it’s going to last long time, I think.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Yeah. So what’s coming up next for you? I know the book has just come out, but is there anything that you’re up to this summer that listeners can check out or anything that you’ve got coming up later on in the year that you want to direct people to?

Ceri Jones:

My plan is to have a really chilled summer. I’ve just had the busiest month of my life where I’ve had to map out all my days being like, oh my god. And there’s that, and there’s that and there’s that. But I’m hoping to have a few more events and I will have a few more events in the autumn, so some more in live cooking classes in London. And I might do a few more bits online and we’ll see how it goes. I work at the Garden Museum part tine, so I’m always there teaching anyway. And there are always public classes people can come to there. But stuff specifically for the book, there’ll be more of that in the autumn when I’ve had some downtime to work out what I want to do next.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Great. And so where can people find you online if they want to check out your recipes, if they want to find the book?

Ceri Jones:

So my website is cerijoneschef.com and all my socials handles the same. So that’s at Ceri Jones, C for Ceri, which is the Welsh spelling. Ceri I’ve got Welsh family is CERI. Oh, and I will also be cooking on a couple of retreats this autumn as well. So look out for those if you like yoga and good food.

Le’Nise Brothers:

Fantastic. Well thank you so much for coming on to the show today, and congratulations again on the book. 

Ceri Jones:

Thank you. Thanks for having me. It’s been great to chat. 

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