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Period Story Podcast, Episode 29: Sabi Kerr, I Love Me As I Am Right Now

On today’s episode of Period Story podcast, I had the pleasure of speaking with Sabi Kerr, a self-love coach and yoga teacher. We had a beautiful conversation that got me a bit emotional at one point! We talked about Sabi’s journey on and off the contraceptive pill, the importance of accepting and sitting with ALL the emotions you feel, toxic positivity and moving away from positive vibes only and of course, Sabi’s first period!

Sabi shared the pride she felt when she got her period and how grown up she felt. She says that the conversations she had with her mum and her friends about periods were really open and accepting. How great is that!

We spent time talking about Sabi’s journey with the pill. She went on the pill when she was around 17, 18 years old and only came off it in January this year. She says she was sure that there was a bit of disconnect between her and her period and coming off the pill was her way of changing that.

Sabi had never had any issues or side effects from taking the pill. When she deciding whether to come off the pill, Sabi says she asked herself if she still wanted to be putting it in her body. She was moving back to London from Bali and felt it was the right time to make this transition.

Listen to hear about Sabi’s transition off the pill and what she learned about her menstrual cycle, including how she was able to make space for her emotions and find the permission to accept herself as she is. I confess that I got a bit emotional when we talked about this!

Sabi shared some beautiful affirmations and a mini practice to help name the emotions you feel. Sabi says that to truly love ourselves, we need to start where we’re at. Thank you, Sabi!

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SABI’S BIO

Sabi Kerr is a self-love coach and yoga teacher. She guides women to fall deeper in love with themselves and release the blocks they have to feeling worthy, so that they can create magical lives full of passion and purpose.

Through 1:1 coaching, workshops, yoga, retreats and group programs, Sabi’s mission is to guide as many people as possible back to their natural essence: a place of deep self-love, self-acceptance and joy.

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SHOW TRANSCRIPT

Le’Nise: On today’s episode, we have Sabi Kerr. Sabi is a self love coach and yoga teacher. She guides women to fall deeper in love with themselves and release the blocks they have to feeling worthy so that they can create magical lives full of passion and purpose. Through 1-2-1 coaching workshops, yoga retreats and group programmes, Sabi’s mission is to guide as many people as possible back to their natural essence, a place of deep love, self acceptance and joy. 

Welcome to the show.

Sabi: Thank you so much for having me. 

Le’Nise: Let’s start off by getting into the story of your first period. Can you share with us what happened? 

Sabi: Yeah, I was thinking about this before I came on. I actually had a chat with my mum and to see if we could piece together the memory together because it was obviously quite a while ago. 

So I was around 12. And my mom remembered this, I didn’t. But it was at home and it was just in the toilet. And I called her in to have a look. 

And I do remember feeling quite, quite proud. Quite grown up. Quite like, I probably like, oh, I’m growing up with the grown up thing to have. 

So I think my feelings around it were feeling proud. Feeling quite happy. Feeling like I was probably like I’m you know, I’m more or about those kind of feelings. So yeah. I was. That was it. 

Le’Nise: Why do you think that you’ve felt so grown up?

Sabi: I guess it’s that that kind of transition when you’re you know, I was around 12. So about to be a teenager. So already that’s the kind of age where you’re starting to feel more grown up. Right. When you when you hit 13, it’s like, oh, I’m kind of a teenager now. So because it was around I was 12. It was around that age. I think any anything in life that happens that make makes you feel a little more grown up. And I guess having your period is one of those things. You’re no longer you’re still a child, obviously. But you associate that with something that a woman has, I think when you’re younger.

Le’Nise: And when you got your first period, you took your mum into the bathroom with you. What was her reaction and how did you how did she educate you about what was happening to you? 

Sabi: Yeah. So I can’t remember her exact reaction. But knowing my mum, I know it would have been quite an encouraging, like, oh, yay. Like, I don’t think she would have said well done. But it would have been quite encouraging and quite supportive. And obviously, she saw that I was feeling quite feeling quite proud about it. So I think it would have just been quite encouraging response she would have given me. 

Le’Nise: And then I guess you would you would have gone back into school and talked about it with your friends. How did they react? 

Sabi: It’s funny how many of these memories are clearer than others, and I haven’t got a particular memory, I just have a feeling. And I think the feeling that I had at that time was, yeah, this was something I talked about with my friends. I think probably some of them had already had theirs. Some of them hadn’t. I remember it being something that I spoke about quite openly with my friends in quite a neutral way. Like it wasn’t that it was great. It wasn’t that it was bad. It was just this is your period, you know. So, yeah, I think I remember speaking to friends about it and being quite an accepted thing to speak about. 

Le’Nise: That’s so interesting because the guests on the show, they’ve shared different reactions about getting their period and their conversations with their friends. And some some of them have said it was there was a lot of secrecy around it and they didn’t want to talk about it. But then others, like you, have said it was an open conversation. And actually, one guest I spoke to a couple of weeks ago said that it was they all thought it made them really cool and everyone wanted to be a part of the period gang. 

Sabi: Yeah, that that and again, these memories aren’t like that clear, but I feel like mine is probably more something like that, probably more, probably like feeling proud, feeling grown up, probably feeling cool was in there too. 

Le’Nise: And that feeling of being proud of your period, has that has that continued as you’ve gotten older, as you went through your teenage years and gotten older? 

Sabi: Yeah. Maybe not. Maybe it’s been an interesting journey, actually. I think after then, I think I probably just saw it as something that happened, you know, just something natural, something I didn’t really give much thought to. I saw it as something kind of neutral, not not nothing terrible, but also nothing in particular to celebrate, just something that happens. For me, it’s been a real process because I went on the pill when I was young, around 18, 17 even could have been until just recently came off it. And I’m 31 now. So around 13 years. It’s a long time not having a natural period. And that’s a long time, you know, suppressing something that’s a really natural part of you. So I think because I haven’t had hadn’t until now had a natural period for so long, there was I’m sure a bit of a disconnect between myself and my period, because it wasn’t a real period. And I knew exactly what was coming. I knew exactly how, you know, it was everything was kind of clockwork. I could stop when I whenever I felt like I could take another path of pills. 

So there was something there about around not fully celebrating it and coming off it. What month are we in now, June? About six months ago. I came off at the beginning of the year. 

And it’s amazing, kind of really getting to know your body better and feeling like now I feel like I can actually celebrate it, you know? And that wasn’t really there before. 

Le’Nise: Wow. So there’s so much I want to ask you. So can you talk firstly about why you went on the pill when you were 17, 18? 

Sabi: Yeah. Just for contraception. Just because that’s so. I didn’t have any. It wasn’t. No. Wasn’t any of the other reasons that people go on the pill, which aren’t contraception, it was purely for contraception. And just for that, feels like the easiest contraception to me. And I will say that my body was absolutely fine on the pill. I had no no negative side effects. Nothing bad happened, which was probably why I stayed on it so long. Because I never I felt absolutely fine. So yeah, so that was why I started going on it. 

Le’Nise: OK. And can you talk a little bit about why you decided six months ago to come off of the pill? 

Sabi: I think it had been a thought in the back of my mind for a while. I kind of thought, do I still want to be putting this into my body. Do I still want to have my body in a natural state continuously? Is it really needed? And that had been, that had been something that had been going on in the back of my mind for a while. But because my body had worked so well with the pill, I’d had I’d never had any. To my knowledge, right. To obvious knowledge, I’ve never had any side effects. Nothing had ever gone wrong. So it was just very easy to continue to take it. And I think that was probably all actually there was a worry of like if I stopped taking it, what might happen? Because you hear all kinds of stories about people coming off the pill after a long time and their bodies not liking the moment they come off. So that was something that was there for me as well. But I think it just got to the point of, like, now is the time. 

There’s no reason for me to continue. Like, this is a good. And I’d also come back to London from from Bali. So I felt like I was in a kind of safer place from a medical point of view, if I need to to the doctors or anything like that. So, yeah, it was kind of like, now is the time. 

Le’Nise: You had a very smooth time on the pill and then the transition off of the pill.  So can you talk a little bit about the last six months and how that transition has been, but also what you’ve started to learn about your body? 

Sabi: So many things. So firstly, I think my transition is, I don’t know. You will know more than me, actually. I only really know from my perspective and from what I’ve heard. I was worried about coming off the pill because I’ve heard, you know, horror stories about how hard it is for people. Actually, for me, it was the smoothest transition ever. I got my, you know. It was so much ever since coming off the pill. 

My cycle’s been 27 days, 28, 29, 30, in that space. Straight away. Straight away. So that was I was surprised. I wasn’t expecting that at all. At all.  Obviously, really happily surprised that my body was able to to go to that natural space so, so quickly. 

And feeling actually not that different. So it was like all of me, like feeling surprisingly like, oh, this was way easier than I thought it was going to be. What other things do I remember noticing? I remember noticing like that, the blood seems different. Like, oh, this looks like real blood now. Almost, I don’t quite know how to to sort of to describe it almost redder, almost just like almost just like how blood is supposed to be. 

So that was something funny that I remember noticing.

And I think what the most beautiful part of the last six months has been is tracking my cycle and making more space for all of my emotions, which is something that I do anyway. And a big part of my my work as a self-love coach when I’m working with clients and also just my personal self development work is really to welcome in all emotions. It’s to welcome in all of the things that I’m feeling and see that they’re all part of us and accept them and love them. And when you track your cycle, it gives you an even even more of a reason to do that. Yeah, I’m feeling like this. Like this is my hormones. This is how my body works. And it gives you even more permission to accept yourself as you are. To love yourself, and however, your emotions are each day in that moment. So I think that’s been a really, really beautiful process. And it’s been really aligned with what I try to practise anyway. So I’ve definitely really enjoyed that. Yeah. 

Le’Nise: What you said is so beautiful about, accept yourself as you are. I just I love that. I actually feel a bit emotional hearing you say that, because I know that that is a journey that a lot of people go through and perhaps they never get to that point. You you said that you’ve you’ve always been really aware of your emotions and you’re open to how you feel. Have you noticed, as you’ve been tracking your cycle over the last six months, any change in your emotions as you go through each of the phases? 

Sabi: Yeah. I need to put it all on a spreadsheet and do some data analysis. Which is something I have been planning to do. I haven’t got round to doing it yet. Sometimes I feel like I have, I’m still quite, you know, it’s quite early on in my tracking my cycle journey. 

Sometimes I find it challenging to know if this is my hormones or this is just what’s going on in my life right now. But a general feeling of the kind of. 

Yeah. Like the spring, summer fades, feeling more productive and being able to do more things. I think I think I’ve noticed that. I’ve definitely noticed that. And then when like moving into the autumn when and I don’t always feel crappy, you know, but if I do feel really crappy and I know it’s that phase in my cycle, that almost gives me more permission to be like, it’s okay. You’re having you’re having a crappy day like, that’s absolutely fine. It reinforces that that’s okay. 

Le’Nise: I think that’s really nice that you’ve been able to say to yourself, you know, that’s OK, and that it’s almost like not giving in to, you know, whatever kind of negative side, because I know that a lot of a lot of people, they they expect to feel bad when they get their period or right before they get their period.  And they you know, in that sense, I think it’s something that we’ve been taught that we just need to fall into this kind of abyss, is too strong a word. 

But this kind of feeling of, oh, I feel really down. I feel really negative about getting my period and how I feel right before my period. And I love the fact that you’ve given yourself permission to say that’s OK. 

Sabi: Yeah. Yeah. That’s OK. And sometimes I feel great. And that’s great too. And I think it’s it’s accepting whatever is without having to expect that you’re going to feel a certain way. But knowing that it’s all it’s all welcome. Yeah. 

Le’Nise: You seem very in touch with your emotions and very self-aware. And as a self-love coach, that’s something that you work with other people on. Can you talk a bit about your journey to getting to this place of openness and awareness? 

Sabi: Yeah, I think I see anytime you have things in life that are challenging, you know, any any moments that trigger those and the emotions, the kind of the shadow emotions. So so if you have if you think like the joy, the happy, the excited, the energetic, those are all the emotions that that we like to label as positive. Right. Positive. And the emotions like anger, the sadness, the grief, the frustration, we label them again, air quotes, negative. And we as humans really like to label those emotions as positive and negative. But I think what that does is it takes takes us out of, like, just the human experience to know these aren’t good or bad. They are all part of the human experience. And when we push away the so-called negative emotions, we push away a big part of what it is to be human. So I think my personal practise has been the times when I feel those more challenging emotions. So, you know, any life experiences that might trigger them. Anything that can happen that feels that feels quite challenging might trigger the anger, the frustration, the sadness, the grief, rather than bypassing them, rather than trying not to feel them, rather than rushing to the joy straight away, rather than numbing my emotions with food, with TV, with drugs, with all of the numbing mechanisms. Can you actually be with them and can you actually allow them and make a little space for them? 

Because it’s you know, it’s like anything that cliche of things often cliche because they’re true. The cliche of like you need to move through them to actually come out the other side. So you need to make space for them. So that’s something that I do personally and work with one to one client. And so I have like a little mini practice that maybe I’ll share. 

Of like actually naming the thing that you’re feeling. Making some space so you can take this as a little ritual or a meditation, naming. 

You can close your eyes, naming the feelings, the emotions that you’re feeling, the anger, the frustration, the sadness, whatever. 

And then, you know, just stay with them. 

Close your eyes, breathe there. Notice where in the body, you’re feeling that anger, that frustration, rather than pushing it away. You can say it’s safe for me to feel angry. I’m making space for myself to feel angry right now. 

And I love the parts of me, that are feeling angry. And that is that is like deep self love. My self love will never be positive vibes only. Self love is about welcoming in every single part of ourselves, including the part that feels angry, including the part that feels jealous. So I’m making space for that. Breathing there without the need to rush away, to push it away and sit there for as long as you need. You know, five minutes, ten minutes, an hour. Sometimes those strong, challenging emotions kind of dissipate by themselves just by sitting with them. 

Sometimes we need to actually release that can be like. Shaking the body, that can be punching a pillow, that can be screaming if you’re in a safe place, that can be like journalling it all out and releasing it with paper onto paper. Yeah. That is such an important process. I think for all humans to realise that these are welcome. And actually, when you welcome them in not wallowing in them, not like wallowing in them. But when you welcome them in and make a little space for them to be felt, that is actually how we get to the joy quicker anyway. You know, the actual actual real deep joy there. Don’t bypass those more challenging emotions. 

Le’Nise: Yeah, I, I love what you’ve said there because it, it’s something that we, we get taught like just don’t be angry, don’t cry. 

You know, you think about it like I think about and I actively do this with my son. 

I say, you know, it’s OK to cry. It’s okay. I know you’re angry. It’s OK to be angry because I remember when I was younger, you know, I was taught, you know, why are you crying? Don’t cry. It’s, you know, stop crying. 

And and I you know, I never cry now because I but when I do cry, it’s always like I am an ugly crier because I feel like it’s because I put I hold so much in and there’s so much to get out. And I actively say to my son, it’s OK to cry. It’s OK. OK, you want to scream right now, you can scream for, you know, a couple of minutes and then let it go and then you need to stop. But we get taught that we have to tamp down our emotions. Especially, as women to fit into this space and we make ourselves smaller and naming the emotions and sitting with them is so it’s different but it’s oh it’s just, it’s so, so powerful. 

Sabi: Yeah. It really, really is. I love what, I love what you just said about. Yeah. Making ourselves smaller by not expressing them because those are parts about our truth you know. Yeah. Those are parts our truth too. The angry parts, the frustrated parts, the sad parts. And we don’t allow ourselves to express them, we’re we’re shrinking our voice. You know, we’re we’re not allowing all parts of ourselves to be to be seen, which can be such a proud, uncomfortable, but really, really empowering when you start to welcome in all parts of your of your being.. 

Le’Nise: You said about how you don’t like, you’re not about positive vibes, only. Talk a little bit about this toxic positivity and what you see in the community, the coaching community, and also perhaps because you’re also a yoga teacher. Also what you see in the yoga community. 

Sabi: Oh, my goodness. Thanks for asking me this question. 

This is such a great question because I’m actually I’m doing a [IG] live tomorrow on the topic of spiritual bypassing. Which is which is just the right. Positive vibes only, like I think the initial intention was good. It would like to make people feel better, which was always a great thing to kind of want and aim for. 

Right. We all want to feel better. 

But the the challenge with positive vibes only is that it makes us feel bad if we don’t feel positive vibes all the time. And it’s like, guess what? It is human to not feel positive all the time and to to make people think they have to be positive all the time is to deny a big part of our human experience, which is all of the emotion. And if you’re positive vibes only, that is saying you have to deny every single one of the more shadow emotions, you know, and then you don’t get to express a big part of who you are. 

And yeah, so on. And that is a big part of spiritual bypassing this this idea that we can use spiritual concepts and terms and words like love and peace and light to bypass the actual real real issues and things that are going on in the world. To bypass the real injustices, to bypass like the the real challenges that people are having. And I see that a lot in the spiritual community, in the yoga community, the preaching of love and light, but then actually bypassing looking at the real issues of how I can really help people. The current racism issue is one of those examples, right? Yoga communities, wellness communities preaching love and light, but actually not doing anything to help the people that really need really, really, actually need help and that have been going on for, like, ever, you know. The spiritual industry is is commercialised now, it’s a moneymaking industry, and I think I struggle with the disconnect between the front facing message of love and light and peace. And then behind the scenes, lots of people not actually doing their real work to actually help people. So, yeah, it’s such is such a big topic. I think now more than ever, for our industry to really look at more. 

Le’Nise: What would you say to someone who they hear what you’re saying and they get that they need to, there’s a place for being angry. Feeling sad. But they they’ve said, actually, I don’t, I really connect with the positive vibes only space idea. But, you know, I just you know, I just don’t want negativity around me. 

Sabi: Yeah. And what I would say, why is anger negative? And this, again, come back to a human like inherent nature of impacting things as positive and negative. I would say, why is anger negative? Why is sadness negative? You know, why is grief negative? I think even just labelling them as negative gives us that connotation that they are bad. And, you know, most people feel like I’m one of the smiley people that I know. Right. I smile all the time like I’m a again, air quotes. I’m a positive person. 

But I’m a positive person that knows I can’t bypass the real stuff, the deep stuff, the shadows stuff. 

So I think anyone that says I just want to be positive vibes only I don’t want any negativity. If they’re then bypassing these more challenging emotions. There’s some stuff deep inside of them that needs to be looked at. A lot of the time. And, you know, the thing is, everyone is on their own journey. Right. 

And it’s not my responsibility, your responsibility, anyone’s responsibility to to make people see things until they’re ready. You know, it’s everybody’s individual responsibility to see the things going on in their lives when they’re ready to see them. And I think that it’s important to to remember as well. We can only do our own individual work. And most people will see the things when they’re when they’re ready to see the things. Yeah. Right now, maybe they’re bypassing because they just aren’t unable to hold space for themselves yet. Who knows? 

Le’Nise: What do you think about the idea that right now we’re going through a great awakening? 

Sabi: Mm hmm. Yeah, we really are. Wow. We so are. And I think. It’s interesting. I don’t know how you feel like being a woman of colour, at a time when so many white people in our industry are awakening to what’s going on with race and with racism. I know for me it feels like. Most of the world is just waking up to what I’ve known my whole life. 

We knew this and you didn’t listen to us. It’s that feeling of like. But that is great. You know, I’m I’m I’m glad it’s. It’s better now than never. And I’m glad that people are finally starting to realise it’s saddening and frustrating what had to happen for people to actually wake up. 

But I’m glad and I’m hopeful. It feels like this kind of a shift hasn’t happened in my lifetime that I’m aware of, you know. So I’m hopeful that more people are doing really important work. More than ever before. So, yes, there is definitely lots of lots of waking up going on. 

And I think that can only be a good thing, but it needs to be continuous. You know, it is like it needs to be something that continues to be looked at. 

I think especially on the topic of racism, it’s like this is not just a let’s do some education for a week and then go back to how we were before. It’s like there is no back to normal. There is no back to normal. This is the new normal. This is a new way of living. This awakening is welcoming in for a lot of people, a new way of looking at the world. And I think that’s what we need to realise that. We’re, yeah, we’re starting a totally new way of living. Yeah. 

Le’Nise: A new way of looking at the world and connecting with the way that a lot of people have already seen the world. And I think it’s really sad that it took these videos of Black death. Black pain for people to open their eyes and see what we already knew and have known for a long time. 

But I really I’m hopeful and I never would have used that word before. 

But I do feel hopeful that this change continues to make people evaluate the way they speak, the way they think about things. And I think, you know, just looking at the industry, the wellness industry, the industry that we both work in, I think there’s a lot of change that needs to happen. And hopefully people are open to that change happening. Yeah. I don’t want to go too deeply into diversity in wellness because I feel like it’s something that, you know, I. I am sure that you’ve been on a diversity in wellness panel. I definitely have. And I would love it if it just stopped being a conversation and just been a thing just to become a thing that people actually do. But I just want to ask you, what are the three things that you think need to be done in the wellness industry to make real change? 

Sabi: Yeah. Firstly, before any of the change happens, people need to know why they’re actually making the changes. I think this is the most important thing. I know. I’ve I’ve shared a lot of things and I’ve said a lot of things. And and maybe what I haven’t said enough, is that before, you know, like having women of colour on your podcast is great, having more people in teaching and yoga classes is great, looking at your teacher trainings and the teachers that are on there, the people that are coming, offering them bursaries. If they’re, you know, a person of colour like all these these things are great, but a very, very, very but, is first of all, this list is not exhaustive. It is not a checklist. And most importantly, you can’t do all those things without actually doing the education first and understanding why you are doing these things. You know that education starts with reading a book. It starts with going to a webinar, but it continues by hiring someone that is trained in diversity in wellness that can continuously, continuously help you or your company do that. So it continues by you hiring and paying a person that is an expert in this area that can help you and your company. And I think that’s that’s what needs to be a continuous thing. The education and the consulting and paying of people that are experts in this area to help you to implement all of the other things that need to be done. 

Le’Nise: I want to shift gears a little bit and go back to talking about the work that you do, because it’s so interesting. I’ve never I’ve never actually met a self-love coach before. So talk a little bit about why you decided to go into this particular area of coaching. 

Sabi: Yeah, so I was definitely. So I did a diploma in transformational coaching. And I’ve done lots of other other types of work beforehand. But I’m a yoga teacher as well. And as I was trying to get more specific on my niche, you know, I was like, I know I want to work with women. I know I want to help them transform their lives, I know I want to help them feel more empowered. And as I was wanting to get more specific on my niche, I realised the links, like all of the women that I’ve worked with so far, the kind of the link that connects all of them with this feeling of worthiness. And for them to have what they were truly desiring in their life, whether it was a more successful business, a more nourishing relationship, a lifestyle that they loved, more stability and whatever it was, the thing that was often blocking them was how worthy they felt of actually having their desires, how worthy they felt of them selves as they are right now. And. Therefore, how worthy they also felt of the things that they were calling into their lives. That was for me, you know, the the link that I saw. And lots of the time I see, you know, it is like to have a life that we are really desiring and that can look like the external goals of the home, the money, the job. But it can also look like the internal goals of just how you feel. And to have that life, we first need to believe that we’re truly worthy of having that life. So, yeah, that was that just feels like something I feel personally so, so connected to and so passionate about sharing. And I just really, really love seeing the transformations that women can make when they see and know that they are truly, inherently worthy just as they are. 

Le’Nise: If someone is listening to this and they they hear what you’re saying and they think I, I don’t I realise I don’t feel worthy in various areas of their lives. What would your message be to them? 

Sabi: Mm hmm. So first of all, it’s OK. We don’t have to jump from like I hate myself to I love myself overnight. 

So almost like almost like the kind of the shadow emotions I was talking about before. Can you learn to love the you right now that doesn’t feel totally worthy. Can you actually accept that you and welcome in that you and if you can work on that, that’s already, that’s already working on your self love. So knowing that it’s okay to make tiny incremental steps in self love to go from like self-hate to kind of just being neutral, to go from neutral to like loving yourself a little bit and knowing that that’s okay. Like, anything, any kind of mindset shift takes takes time, but it’s finding acceptance along the way. Self love is not a destination of you’re there and you’re done. And for me, it is the same. Self-love is something I practise every single day, every single moment. Life gives me opportunities to to love myself more. Especially those challenging times, especially when the shadow emotions come up, because it’s easy to love yourself when you’re happy, when you’re making money, when you’re like when you’re in a loving relationship, when everything’s going well. It’s really easy to love yourself then. But it’s like, can you find and make space to love yourself when you’re not feeling so great, when you’re not positive vibes only. Can you start to find some acceptance for you there in those moments? So that’s why I say start where you’re at. You don’t need you don’t need to conquer self love in a day. Start where you’re at. And a really beautiful affirmation. There’s so many. 

But it’s like it’s safe for me to be as I am right now or I love me as I am right now. 

Le’Nise: Wow. I love me as I am right now. Oh, wow. Chills, I’m feeling chills. So where can listeners get in touch with you? They listen to what you said. They they want to know more. How can they find you? 

Sabi: Yeah. So it’s because I’m really active on Instagram, which is just my name: @sabi.kerr. And my web site is www.sabikerr.com. So both of Instagram and my website, there’s information about me, about coaching if anyone’s interested in working together. So, yeah.

Le’Nise: Great. So if listeners take one thing away from all of the insights that you’ve shared on this show, what would you want that to be? 

Sabi: Hmm. Probably the last, probably that last affirmation that it’s safe to love you as you are right now, that you don’t need to be fixed, that you don’t need to be changed. That right now, as you are, you are enough.

Le’Nise: Thank you so much for coming on the show. It’s just been wonderful speaking to you. 

Sabi: Thank you so much for having me. It’s been so much fun. 

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