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Category: Thyroid Health

What are the best foods to support good thyroid health?

To round out the thyroid health series, let’s look at how we can eat to support our thyroids!

 

Making sure you have enough zinc, iodine and selenium in your diet are key ways of supporting your thyroid health.

 

Including lots of fruit and vegetables, including cooked greens, brazil nuts, eggs, beetroot, chickpeas and lentils, grass fed organic red meat and dairy and wild-caught seafood will help.

 

Notice a theme?

 

Essentially, if you’re eating a diet that includes 7-10 portions of fruit and vegetables that are a mix of cooked and raw, nuts & seeds, high quality meat & dairy and wild-caught seafood, you’re well on your way to eating for good thyroid health!

 

Do you want to know about your thyroid health? Book in a free 30 minute Hormone Health Review with me! 

 

Photo by Travis Yewell on Unsplash 

Let’s talk about how our thyroids are affected by stress!

 

Let’s talk about your thyroid and stress!

 

Good thyroid health is closely connected the health of your glands that produce your stress hormones – your adrenals. These tiny glands are located on top of your kidneys.

 

Chronic stress is the enemy of a happy and balanced hormonal system.

 

Sustained levels of stress increase the amount of cortisol (the stress hormone) that your adrenals produce. And when you’re constantly stressed and not doing anything to reduce your stress levels, this causes a disruption to balanced thyroid hormone production.

 

Here’s the science: Chronic cortisol production means you produce less free T3 and too much reverse T3, which blocks thyroid hormone receptors.

 

What do I mean by chronic stress?

 

These are things that place stress on your body: not getting enough sleep, not eating enough fruit and vegetables, dehydration, excessive levels of cardio, shallow breathing, physically and emotionally abusive relationships, constant worry, amongst many others.

 

Doing things to act as a counterbalance to stress is essential for balanced hormones!

 

We all live busy lifestyles so some amount of stress is normal – it’s when you’re not doing anything to offset that stress, that issues can arise.

 

How do you manage your stress?

 

Do you want to you know more about your thyroid? Schedule in a 30 minute Hormone Health Review with me! 

 

Photo by Antonika Chanel on Unsplash

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Do you need to care more about your thyroid in your 40s and 50s?

Do you need to think about your thyroid health more as you move into your 40s and 50s?

 

In short, yes!

 

Research shows that hypothyroidism tends to be more common in women over 40, as thyroid hormone production gradually decreases as we get older.

 

For women in their late 40s and 50s, it’s worth noting that symptoms of menopause are similar to hypothyroid symptoms, so you might be doing everything you can to manage your menopause and still find that you continue to suffer from dry skin, weight gain, lethargy, dry hair, constipation, low mood, reduced concentration and poor memory.

 

Does this sound like you?

 

I would encourage you to get your thyroid hormones (TSH / T3 / T4) checked as part of your annual check up and even sooner, if this is something that’s troubling you right now.

 

Do you have questions about your thyroid? Book in a 30 minute Hormone Health Review with me! 

 

Photo by Edward Cisneros on Unsplash

Why you need to care about your thyroid!

 

Over the last week, we’ve been talking about our thyroids. We’ve talked about what happens when you produce too much thyroid hormone and when you produce too little.

 

We’ve learned that the thyroid is a bit like Goldilocks – you want to make sure that you get the balance just right.

 

You might be thinking, “well, Le’Nise, neither of those apply to me, so why do I need to care about my thyroid?”.

 

Your thyroid controls your body’s metabolism and energy (that’s pretty important, right?), however nothing in our body works in isolation. Research shows that imbalances in our progesterone & estrogen levels can have an effect on our thyroid hormone production and vice versa.

 

Taking care of your hormone health (with sleep, a balanced diet, stress reduction, regular emptying of the bowels and lots of physical movement) isn’t just about caring for reproductive hormones – your thyroid and stress hormones will also benefit too!

 

Would you to find out more about your thyroid or ask specific questions related to your thyroid or hormone health? Book in for a free 30 minute Hormone Health Review!

 

Photo by Denys Nevozhai on Unsplash

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What happens when you produce too much thyroid hormone?

In my last post, I talked about producing too little thyroid hormone. Now let’s talk about what happens when you produce too much.

 

Do you often feel out of breath or short of breath?

 

You might have trouble keeping weight on.

 

Do you feel like your eyes look like they might pop out of your head?

 

You might feel like you get tremors or shakes or heart palpitations.

 

You might sweat excessively or feel very hyperactive all the time.

 

You might be losing your hair.

 

You might have a swelling in your neck caused by an overactive thyroid gland.

 

In combination, these can be symptoms of an overactive thyroid. If left unchecked, an overactive thyroid / hyperthyroidism can be life threatening.

 

If this is you, I would encourage you to get your thyroid hormones checked as soon as possible!

 

Would you to find out more about your thyroid or ask specific questions related to your thyroid or hormone health? Book in for a free 30 minute Hormone Health Review!

 

Photo by Kunj Parekh on Unsplash

What happens when you produce too little thyroid hormone?

If your thyroid hormones are a little bit like Goldilocks, what happens when you produce too little of them?

 

You may find that you struggle to lose weight.

 

You might feel tired all the time.

 

You might empty your bowels less than once a day.

 

You might always have cold hands & feet and fight with your partner over the thermostat in the winter.

 

You might feel a little down in the dumps but aren’t sure why.

 

You might have a hard time concentrating or feel a little foggy.

 

These aren’t normal things you should expect as part of ageing.

 

When you piece the puzzle together, these symptoms can be the sign of an under active thyroid.

 

If you feel like this, I would encourage you to see your doctor and get your thyroid hormones (TSH / T4 / T3) checked as part of a full blood test.

 

Do you have any questions? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone health review!

 

Photo by Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

How much do you know about your thyroid?

 

Let’s talk about our thyroids!

 

Our thyroids are a gland that sit in our neck and produce thyroid hormones, which are one of the top three most important hormones for women.

 

Can you guess the other two? Estrogen and cortisol!

 

Over the next week, I want to talk a little about the thyroid, because thyroid heath is an important part of good hormone health for women.

 

Our thyroid affects our metabolism and our energy levels – think of the thyroid a little bit like Goldilocks.

 

If you produce too little thyroid hormone, you can feel sluggish, gain weight easily and get constipated. This can lead to hypothyroidism.

 

Too much can send you in the other direction with weight loss, shakiness and shortness of breath, amongst other symptoms and can lead you to hyperthyroidism.

 

How much do you know about your thyroid?

 

Do you have any questions? Get in touch for a free 30 minute hormone health review!

 

Image via Allef Vinicius on Unsplash

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